Honored Dead – World War II

   Listed here are men from the Klamath Basin who died while serving in the military during World War II. The list includes those who died in combat or as the result of accidental injury either at home or abroad.

   In some cases little or no information is available about individuals listed here. In most cases, additional information is on file at the Klamath County Museum.

 

Adams, John Wayne

March 28, 1945, Germany

   Born in Redlands, Calif., Jan. 13, 1913, Adams later lived in Sprague River where he was employed at the Crater Lake Lumber and Box Company. He was inducted into the Army May 10, 1942, receiving his training at Fort Knox, Ky., and Fort Benning, Ga. Adams served as a radio technician with the 489th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Armored Division, and had been overseas for one year before his death at the age of 31.

   He was survived by his wife, Violet, and their 20-month-old son, Richard Wayne. Adams was awarded the Silver Star and Purple Heart and is buried in the Netherlands American Cemetery in Margraten, Netherlands.

 

Adkins, Marvin

Dec. 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor

Entering the service from Arizona, Adkins served as a gunner’s mate, third class, in the U.S. Navy. He died Dec. 7, 1941, at Pearl Harbor on the battleship U.S.S. Oklahoma. Adkins was among 429 officers, sailors and Marines that died that day on the Oklahoma.  His father, Harold R. Adkins, formerly of Klamath Falls, was informed of his son’s death. Adkins was awarded the Purple Heart and his name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Ambrogetti, Walter

Sept. 17, 1944, Europe

   Born in Klamath Falls on March 5, 1923, Ambrogetti attended city schools here. He was a lumber handler at Sprague River before entering the service on Sept. 24, 1943.  He was a tail gunner on a B-17 Flying Fortress with the 614th Bomber Squadron, 401st Bomber Group, heavy, at the time of his death at the age of 20.

   Abrogetti was awarded the Purple Heart, and is buried at the Cambridge American Cemetery in Cambridge, England.

   His wife, Florene Ambrogetti, mother and step-father, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Pedersen, and a brother, Frank Pedersen were notified of his death.

 

Anderson, Clarence

July 8, 1944, Eniwetok Island

Born and educated in Cass Cou County, Illinois, Anderson came to Oregon with his family in 1939. Before entering the Army in 1941, he was employed by Kesterson Lumber Co. in Klamath Falls. He received his basic training at Camp Roberts, Calif., and was then sent to the Hawaiian islands. After taking part in the invasion of Makin Island he served on Oahu as a jungle fighting instructor. He was fatally wounded during battle at Eniwetock. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Anderson of Klamath Falls were informed of his death.

 

Andrews, Oscar

July 2, 1944, Saipan

   A resident of Klamath Falls, Andrews was serving with the U.S. Marine Corps in the South Pacific when he was reported as wounded in a list of naval casualties. He was 22 at the time of his death. He was a member of the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve.

   Andrews’ parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mose Andrews of 421 Homedale Road, were informed y the War Department of their son’s death.

 

Andrews , Raymond G.

March 10, 1942, Ellington Field, Texas

   Born in 1920, Andrews, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps on July 29, 1941.

   He was a member of the 70th School Squadron and was killed in an accident at Ellington Field, Texas. He was 21 years old.

   Andrews’ father, Mose Andrews of Klamath Falls, was informed of his son’s death.

 

Arnold, John

Jan. 11, 1945, France

   Born in Minnesota in 1925, Arnold was employed locally as a truck driver for C.A. Dunn Construction company. He was inducted into the Army from Portland, Ore., on Nov. 10, 1943, and was trained at Camp Shelby, Miss., and was later transferred to Camp Phillips in Kansas. He received his overseas orders and served for five months with Company E, 324th Infantry, before his death at age 19.

   Arnold’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Arnold of Klamath Falls, and sister, Mrs. Blanche Engelking, were notified of his death.

 

Baker, Harvey

May 2, 1945, Okinawa

   Born in Oklahoma in 1922, Baker attended both grade and high schools in Klamath Falls. Prior to his enlistment June 10, 1943, he was employed at Swan Island shipyards in Portland. He received his training at Camp Roberts, Calif., reporting for overseas duty, in November that same  year. Baker took part in several major battles, including Saipan and Okinawa. He was awarded the Combat Infantryman’s Badge for action on Saipan. He was 22 at the time of his death.

   His mother, Mrs. Ted Knopp of Klamath Falls, was notified of his death. He is buried at Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, Calif.

 

Baldwin, Floyd
Sept. 19, 1944, Palau Islands

   Born and raised in Klamath Falls, Baldwin, also known as “Tom,” graduated from Klamath Union High School with the class of 1940. He enlisted with the Marines from here on June 30, 1942.

   His mother, Mrs. Laura Baldwin of Klamath Falls, was informed of his death. In addition to his mother, he was survived by two sisters, Mrs. Arliene Coffelt of Watsonville, Calif., and Mrs. Nellie Williams of Klamath Falls. He was preceded in death by his father, Charles R. Baldwin.

   Baldwin was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. He was 23 at the time of his death.

 

Barnes , Lloyd C.

July 26, 1943, North Africa

Formerly of the Henley area, Barnes served with the Army in the North Africa region. His wife, living in Grants Pass, was informed of his death.

  

Basler, Roy

April 27, 1945, Okinawa

   Originally from Kansas, Basler came to Oregon in September of 1935.He was employed by the Klamath Machine and Locomotive company, and the Pacific Fruit and Produce company prior to his induction Jan. 20, 1944. Basler trained at Camp Croft, S.C., and reported for overseas duty eight months before his death. He was 31 years old.

   Basler’s wife, Mrs. Gladys L. Basler, and 6-year-old son, Larry Gail, both of Klamath Falls, were informed by a telegram from the War Department of his death. He was also survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.M. Basler of Erie, Kansas, six sisters and five brothers.

 

Beck, Leo

May 20, 1943, Lancaster, Calif.

Born in 1918, Beck enlisted in the Army from Klamath Falls on Sept. 16, 1940. He served with the 14th Army Air Force Flying Training Detachment at War Eagle Field in Lancaster, Calif., where he died during a basic training crash. His father, Leo Beck of Klamath Falls, was informed of his death.

 

Bedord, William

April 20, 1942, Australia

Enlisting from Fort Lewis, Wash., on Oct. 11, 1941, Bedord, a resident of Klamath County, served with the Army Air Corps. After previously being reported as missing, Bedord was found to have died in a plane crash in Australia. His mother, Mrs. Stella Bedord of Klamath Falls, was informed of his death.

 

Bell, Hillard

April 2, 1945, Zamami Island

   Born in Klamath Falls Sept. 28, 1924, Bell graduated from Klamath Union High School in 1943. He was employed by the Southern Pacific railroad before his induction Aug. 25, 1943.

   After receiving his overseas orders, Bell was sent to Pearl Harbor where he transferred from the infantry to the engineers. He was mortally wounded when a Japanese bomber crashed into the bridge of his ship.

   Company C, of which Bell was a member, named its company street “Bell’s Row” in his honor. He was 20 at the time of his death.

   His wife LaRayne Bell, parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert A. Bell, two brothers and a sister were notified of his death. His brother, Virgil Bell, was killed in action on New Guinea September 1943.

 

Bell, Virgil A.

Sept. 8, 1943, New Guinea

Born in 1913 in Oregon, Bell, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the Army on Oct. 17, 1941. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Bell of Klamath Falls were informed of his death. On the year anniversary of their son’s death, the Bells received a letter from Heather Jenkinson of Australia, which included the following poem: “Memories are a golden chain, That bind us ’til we meet again.” Bell’s brothers, Calvin and Hillard, were also in the service. Hillard died during battle in 1945.

 

Benson, Gordon

Jan. 7, 1945, Philippines

   Benson, a graduate of the University of Oregon, trained as a pilot with the newly formed U.S. Army Air Corps. His squadron, at Iba Field on Luzon, was attacked Dec. 7, 1941. Benson was one of the few pilots to get a plane off the ground during the attack. He was taken as a prisoner of war a few months later.

   On the evening of July 23, 1945, Benson‘s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Steve Benson of Klamath Falls, received a telegram from the War Department stating he was killed while being transported aboard a Japanese vessel. He was among 1,619 prisoners of war reported killed aboard a ship which was bombed and sunk in Subic Bay, the Philippines.

 

Bergquist, Arthur

July 26, 1944, France

An employee of Bly’s Crane Mills and Ivory Pine Co., Bergquist, a native of Sweden, was inducted into the Army on Nov. 10, 1942. His mother and brother, of Vansbro, Sweden, were informed of his death. Bergquist was 37 years old.

 

Bosworth, Clifford

Sept. 10, 1944, France

   Born Aug. 20, 1920, in Brockway, Ore., Bosworth came to the Spring Lake area of Klamath County following his graduation from Roseburg High School. He farmed with James Bunnell for three years, until his enlistment Nov. 10, 1943.

   While stationed in England he underwent a major operation and could not leave with his division which took part in the D-Day invasion of Normandy. He rejoined his division only a short time before his death at the age of 24.

   His mother, Mrs. John Walker of Roseburg, was informed of his death.

 

Brooks, John

Feb. 20, 1944, Eniwetok Atoll

   Enlisting with the U.S. Marine Corps from Klamath Falls in August, 1942, Brooks was assigned overseas in November, 1943.

   His wife, Mrs. Mildred Brooks, of Pleasanton, Calif., was informed of her husband’s death by the War Department on Feb. 20, 1944. He was 25 years old.

 

Brown, Dale

Jan. 15, 1943, Kansas

Born in 1919 in South Dakota, Brown, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted in the Army from Portland on March 26, 1942. He served with the 375th Bomber Squadron with the Army Air Force and died in a plane crash in California. His father, C.C. Brown of Dairy, and mother, Mrs. Belle Brown of Bonanza, were informed of his death.

 

Brown, Melvin

July 8, 1944, Saipan

Born in 1918, Brown was employed by the J.B. Casey Ranch in Beatty. He was inducted into the Army May 21, 1943, serving with the 105th Infantry Regiment, 27th Infantry Division on Saipan. His wife, Mrs. Estelle M. Brown of Beatty, and his mother, Mrs. Mabel Lopez of Smith River, Calif., were informed he had been seriously wounded in action and later died of his wounds. Brown was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.

 

Buick, Walter A.

June 6, 1944, Normandy

   Born in Lake County in 1922, Buick attended school in Klamath Falls, graduating from Klamath Union High School in 1940. He enlisted in the Army March 17, 1943.

   Buick was originally reported as wounded during the June 6, 1944, D-Day invasion of Normandy. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. K.O. Buick, of Klamath Falls, received word of his death in September, 1944.

   He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart, which was sent to his parents, and was buried in the Normandy American Cemetery in Colleville-sur Mer, France.

 

Bunnell, Robert

Oct. 9, 1944, Germany

   Born in Branson, Colo., Bunnell moved to Klamath Falls with his family in 1943. Bunnell graduated from Klamath Union High School in 1936, received a scholarship to Linfield College where he attended one year before transferring to Oregon State University where he received his degree. He entered the Army in 1942 and was sent overseas six weeks before his death at the age of 25.

   His wife, Maybelle Bunnell, parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.S. Bunnell, all of Sandy, Ore., were informed of his death. He was also survived by a sister, Mrs. Lucille Ogden of Branson, Colo., and an uncle, Robert Ross, of Klamath Falls.

 

Burgess, Bob Roy

Jan. 24, 1945, Philippines

   Born in Klamath Falls Sept. 19, 1924, Burgess graduated in 1943 from Klamath Union High School. He was an Eagle Scout and a member of Troop 9. Before entering the Navy in August of 1943, Burgess was employed by J.C. Penney and Western Union.

   He attended boot camp at Farragut, Idaho, and was later sent to the Navy’s radio school at the University of Idaho, Moscow. Burgess was originally reported as missing in mid-March of 1945, but word of his death was received that same month by his mother, Mrs. William J. Burgess of Wocus. He was 20 years old.

   Burgess was also survived by his father, William Burgess of Sacramento, and a brother and sister, both of Klamath Falls.

 

Burgess, Lawrence

April 7, 1945, Germany

   Born in Kansas in 1922, Burgess moved to Klamath Falls with his mother, Mrs. Molly Burgess, in 1939. He graduated in 1940 from Klamath Union High School and was employed with the U.S. Forest Service before entering the Army on June 10, 1943.

   He was serving in radio communications with General Patton’s Third Army at the time of his death at the age of 22.

   His mother received his Purple Heart medal from the War Department with a letter of condolence from his commanding officer. Burgess was also survived by his father, L.G. Burgess of Kansas, and one brother, Bill Burgess, who was stationed overseas.

 

Burns, James

1945, Pacific Theater

   Born in Oklahoma in 1920, James Burns enlisted in the Army on July 24, 1943, from Phoenix, Ariz. 

   Burns served in the Pacific theater of operations.

   His mother, Mrs. Lela Burns of Klamath Falls, was informed of her son’s death.

 

 

Burrell, Howard Findholt

July 27, 1945

   Burrell’s mother, Mrs. M.P. Crowder, of the Pelican City area, was informed of her son’s death. He was buried at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.

 

Cameron, Robert Keith

Aug. 7, 1942, Solomon Islands

   Well known in the Henley district, Cameron played on the Hornets’ football team as a sophomore in 1939. In 1940 he moved to Grants Pass and joined the Navy there before completing his high school work.

   While stationed overseas, Cameron took part in an offensive on the Solomon Islands. He was killed at 5:45 a.m. on the first day of the attack, according to news reports, just an hour and forty-five minutes after the offensive began. Cameron served as both a radio operator and gunner. He was 18 at the time of his death.

   His father, of Grants Pass, and sister, Mrs. Otis Johnson of the Henley area, were informed of his death. Cameron’s name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery, in Manila, Philippines.

 

Campbell, Hugh B. Jr.

Oct. 5, 1942, Mather Field, Calif.

Born in 1916 in Washington, Campbell, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on April 25, 1942, in Portland. His father, Hugh B. Campbell of the Pacific Terrace area, was informed of his death at Mather Field, Calif.

 

Carmichael, Orville T.

March 2, 1944, England

Born in 1916, Carmichael, came to Klamath County with his family from Indianola, Neb. A former employee of the Huffman Ranch at Willow Creek, Calif., he enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Forces March 11, 1942, at the Presidio of Monterey in California. Carmichael was stationed at Shepard Field, Texas, then Las Vegas where he received most of his training and was moved to Idaho before being sent overseas.

While serving with the 566th Bomber Squadron, 389th Heavy Bomber Group, Carmichael was killed somewhere over England. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Carmichael, and sister, Carol Carmichael, formerly of Malin, were informed of his death. Carmichael’s brother Dale, was serving with the Seabees.

 

Carnes, George

Jan. 20, 1945, Belgium

   Living in Klamath Falls at the time of his induction into the Army, Carnes was a former Bonanza resident. He was serving in the 290th Infantry Regiment, 75th Infantry Division at the time of his death.

   Previously reported as missing in action, his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Carnes, of Klamath Falls, was later informed by the War Department of her son’s death. Burgess was also survived by three brothers, Orland, Raymond and Hester, who were serving overseas with the military. Burgess was awarded the Purple Heart and was buried in the Ardennes American Cemetery in Neupre, Belgium.

 

Carter, Paxton

December 1941, Pearl Harbor

Entering the service from Mississippi, Carter died aboard the battleship USS Arizona while serving as Acting Pay Clerk with the U.S. Navy. Carter was listed among 1,177 casualties aboard the Arizona, which was attacked by Japanese forces at Pearl Harbor. His wife of Bell, Calif., and father, T.C. Carter of Klamath Falls, were informed of his death. Carter’s name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Chaney, Adrian

Oct. 18, 1944, Palau Islands

   Born on July 27, 1920, in Ashland, Chaney , also known as “Bill,” attended Klamath Union High School before enlisting in the Army on June 19, 1942. He trained in Alabama, Tennessee, Arizona and at Camp San Luis Obispo in California, where he married his wife, Barbara Lee.

   Chaney was a member of the “Wildcats,” 81st Infantry Division which followed the Marines into the Palau Islands. He was killed while attempting to rescue a wounded comrade during action on Leleliu Island. He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star. The citation accompanying the medal read: “While participating in an attack against enemy caves and emplacements located in the inland ridges of Peleliu, Sgt. Chaney observed a comrade fall wounded to enemy fire. Without considering his personal safety in the face of enemy machine gun fire, he moved to the side of the wounded man and had just completed rendering emergency first aid when he received mortal wounds. His heroic act of self-sacrifice inspired everyone who witnessed it.”

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.O. Chaney, and brother, James, of Klamath Falls, received last written word of their son and brother in a letter dated Oct. 12, 1944, when he was stationed on Kanga Island in the South Pacific. Chaney was 24 at the time of his death.

 

Cheyne, Rollo

July 30, 1944

   Attending Henley and Klamath Union high schools, Cheyne was a member of the schools’ football and basketball teams. He entered the National Guard in 1940, receiving an honorable discharge in May, 1941. He then enlisted with the Marine paratroops, going overseas in March 1943.

   Cheyne had participated in eight major battle campaigns in a little more than a year of service in the South Pacific at the time of his death at the age of 21.

   His mother, Mrs. Fannie Cheyne of the Merrill area, received word of his death. Cheyne’s youngest brother, Dale, was serving with the Marine Corps paratroops at the time of his brother’s death..

 

Cogdill, William

March 7, 1945, Iwo Jima

   Enlisting in the Marine Corps in December of 1941, Cogdill trained at San Diego, Calif. He served for seven months in New Zealand, and was later deployed to participate in the battles of Bougainville, Guadalcanal and Iwo Jima. He was 21 years old at the time of his death in the Battle of Iwo Jima.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Cogdill Sr. of Klamath Falls, were informed by a telegram from the War Department of their son’s death.

   Cogdill was also survived by one brother, Joe Cogdill, who was also serving overseas, three sisters, Mrs. Donna Turner, and Patricia and Dorothea Cogdill, all of Klamath Falls.

 

Coleman, Ira M.

March 7, 1941, Fort Stevens, Oregon

Born in Kansas, Coleman, was a resident of Klamath County. He enlisted with Oregon’s Coast Artillery Corps on Sept. 16, 1940, from Klamath Falls. He was 49 years old at the time.

Coleman’s unit was serving at Fort Stevens when he died suddenly the following March. Memorial services were held at the Elks Temple in Klamath Falls. He was survived by his wife, Louise.

 

Colvin, Jack

April 1, 1945, Unimak, Alaska

   A graduate of Klamath Union High School, Colvin served with the U.S. Coast Guard Reserves at the Scotch Cap Lighthouse at Unimak Alaska, on the Aleutian Islands.

   A tsunami destroyed the lighthouse on April 1, 1946, killing Colvin and four other Coast Guardsmen in the five-story reinforced concrete building located atop a 115-foot-tall cliff.

   His parents, Carl Colvin of Klamath Falls, and Ethel Colvin of Juneau, Alaska, were informed of his death.

 

Cox, Carl

Feb. 1, 1945, Luzon

   Born in Wisconsin in 1921, Cox enlisted with the Army July 3, 1942. He trained at Camp White in Medford, and camps Claiborne and Livingston in Louisiana. He shipped to Honolulu in July of 1944, serving with the 152nd Infantry Regiment, 38th Infantry Division. He was then sent to New Guinea, where his father, James Cox, serving with the Seabees, visited him for a week from his base in the Admiralties.

   Cox was serving in the Philippines for two or three months prior to his death during the Luzon campaign.

   His mother, along with his father, who had returned to Klamath Falls for 30 days’ leave, were informed of their son’s death. Cox’s younger brother, Robert, with the Marine Corps, was recovering in San Diego from wounds received on Saipan.

   Cox was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Cress, Frank

Sept. 26, 1944, Holland

   Born in Twin Falls, Idaho, on July 12, 1921, Cress moved to Klamath Falls with his family in 1923. He attended Altamont Elementary School, and graduated in 1940 from Klamath Union High School. He was employed by the post office and Ewauna Box company before enlisting on July 24, 1942. He trained at Fort Benning, Ga., and was deployed overseas in September, 1943. He wrote this to his mother regarding the D-Day invasion of Normandy:

   “Mom, you keep asking me what I did in the invasion. Well, that is hard to write about. We, the outfit, did what we were supposed to and then some. We can now wear a small star in the middle of our wings and also on our ETO ribbon. What I’m proud of though is the Presidential Citation and the expert combat infantry medal. Don’t you think that is enough for one trip?”

   His mother, Mrs. Gladys Cress of Klamath Falls, was informed by the War Department of his death, and received the Purple Heart posthumously awarded to her son. Cress, 23 at the time of his death, was also survived by a brother,  Harmon Cress, serving with the U.S. Army Air Corps in Italy, a sister, Mrs. Ida Loper of California, and a half-brother, Eldon Cress, of Portland.

 

Crews, Howard Eugene

Jan. 5, 1945, Luxembourg

   Crews came to Klamath Falls from Southern California, where he had been employed for 13 years with the Union Pacific. During his residence here, Crews made his home at 336 Broad. He is survived by three children living in California.

   Born in Los Angeles on Aug. 20, 1911, Crews moved from Southern California to Klamath Falls to work as a fireman with the Southern Pacific railroad. He had been employed with the railroad for 13 years before coming to Klamath Falls, and  was employed here for one year before he was inducted in the U.S. Army on May 9, 1943.

   Crews was survived by three children living in California, and is buried at Luxembourg American Cemetery in Luxembourg. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Darnell, Floyd

Feb. 26, 1945, Iwo Jima

   A lifelong Klamath Falls resident, Darnell attended Mills Elementary School and Klamath Union High School. He entered the service in December of 1942, serving in the Marine Corps’ Fifth Division. He was a veteran of Guadalcanal and Tulagi and died at the age of 24.

   His sister, Mrs. Cora Wilkins of Klamath Falls, received word of his death. He was also survived by his parents, Mr. And Mrs. J.R. Darnell, of Chico, Calif., and four sisters, Wilkins, Hazel and Nora Darnell of Chico, and one brother, Carl, of Portland.

   He posthumously received the Purple Heart and is buried at Honolulu Memorial on Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Derrah, Harold

April 4, 1946, Marianas Islands

   Born Dec. 31, 1919, in Soperton, Wis., Darrah was employed by Weyerhaeuser Timber company and the Kalpine Plywood company before entering the Navy on Nov. 4, 1941. He  served aboard the USS Grayling which was declared lost while he was home on a 30-day leave. He was later assigned to the Submarine Kete, July 31, 1945, when it was commissioned at Manitowac, Wis.

   Darrah’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Darrah of Klamath Falls, were informed that the Kete was presumed missing in the Marianas in March, 1945. He was also survived by two brothers, serving with the Army in Europe.

   Darrah, 26 at the time of his death, was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, on Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Davis, Wesley

Jan. 12, 1944, San Clemente, Calif.

Formerly of Tulelake, Davis was 18 years old when he died in an airplane accident near San Clemente, Calif.

 

Degerlamoe, Tony

July 5, 1944, Mediterranean

   Born in San Antonio, Texas, in 1923, Degerlamoe lived in Klamath Falls for three years, working at Big Lakes Lumber company, prior to enlisting on Nov. 4, 1942. He trained at Camp Adair, Ore., and was shipped overseas in March of 1944, serving with the 363rd Infantry Regiment, 91st Infantry Division, three months before his death at the age of 21.

   His wife, Mrs. Evelyn Degerlamoe of Klamath Falls, previously received word that her husband was reported as missing in action. Degerlamoe was also survived by his 1-year-old daughter, BettyLou.

   He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and is buried at the Florence American Cemetery in Florence, Italy.

 

Delaney, Madison

May 18, 1945, Okinawa

   Coming to Klamath Falls from Virginia at the age of 3, Madison Delaney attended Mills Elementary and Klamath Union High schools. In 1940 he moved with his family to Lakeview. He entered the Navy on June 29, 1944, serving aboard the USS Longshaw. The Longshaw was destroyed by Japanese forces after running aground on Ose Reef off the coast of Okinawa. Delaney was 21 years old.

   Delaney’s wife, Tillie, and son, Eugene, were informed of his death. He was also survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Delaney of Lakeview, and four sisters.

   Delaney received three major engagement battle ribbons and two Bronze Stars and was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

 

DeMille, John W.

May 10, 1943, Sicily

   Born Jan. 1, 1913 in Stevensville, Mont., DeMille attended school in Klamath Falls while living with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Gene Cotrell. He was employed by Ewauna Box Co. in Klamath Falls before enlisting in the U.S. Army Air Corps on April 8, 1942, in Portland. DeMille served as a Flying Fortress gunner and was reported as missing during the invasion of Sicily. His plane was credited with shooting down seven enemy aircraft. All but one of the crew on the B-17 was killed. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Roy DeMille, and his grandmother, all of Ashland, were informed of his death a year after the mission over Sicily.

 

Dexter, John Douglas

July 30, 1943, Klamath Falls

Dexter attended Mills Elementary School and Klamath Union High School before joining the Army in July 1943.

He had been in the Army only about two weeks when he died from injuries sustained in an accident near Keno. The accident occurred while he was on a 10-day furlough. Before joining the Army he had worked for a logging company in Gilchrist. He was buried in Linkville Cemetery. He was survived by his parents, five sisters and four brothers.

 

Dieter, William

April 18, 1942, Doolittle Raid over Tokyo

   Born Oct. 5, 1912, in Vail, Iowa, Dieter enlisted Oct. 29, 1936, at Vancouver Barracks, Wash., graduating from Coast Artillery Motor School, at Fort Lewis, Wash., in 1938. He re-enlisted Dec. 12, 1940, with the U.S. Army Air Corps’  95th Bombardment Squadron at McChord Field, Wash. Before his second enlistment, Dieter spent 10 months working on the family farm at Tulelake. Dieter served as a bombardier during the Doolittle Raid of Tokyo on April 18, 1942, and died when his plane crashed during the mission. He was was reported as missing in action, and was believed to be a prisoner of war in Japan.

   His mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Dieter of Tulelake, received word of his death more than three years after the mission. Dieter was also survived by a brother, Jesse Dieter, Jr. of Potosi, Mo., and a sister, Mrs. Guy Sheldon of Macdoel. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart and the Chinese Breast Order of Yung Hui.

 

Dunham, Don B.

Sept. 21, 1943, Italy

   A member of the U.S. Army paratroopers, Dunham died during an invasion near Altaville, Italy. Stories of Dunham’s death were written by war correspondents and printed in newspapers throughout the nation. His brother, Dale Dunham, died two years later while serving in Italy. Dunham’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Dunham of Klamath Falls, along with his sister, Dorothy, were informed of his death.

 

Dunham, Dale

Feb. 28, 1945, Italy

   Born in Klamath Falls on Jan. 31, 1921, Dunham graduated from Klamath Union High School with the class of 1939. He enlisted on Dec. 2, 1942, in Portland, serving with the U.S. Army until his death, a little more than two years later, at the age of 24.

   Dunham’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Dunham of Klamath Falls, received a message from the War Department, informing them of their son’s death. This was the family’s second son lost to war. Dunham’s brother, Major Donald Beeson Dunham, of the U.S. Army Paratroops, died two years earlier.

   Dunham was also survived by a sister, Dorothy.

 

Elder, Douglas M.

Feb. 18, 1944, Douglas, Ariz.

Born Sept. 26, 1913, in Phyler, Idaho, Elder worked three years as a mechanic with Ivory Pine Co., in Bly. He enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps Oct. 14, 1942, in San Francisco. Elder, who served as an aircraft engineer on a bomber, was doing repair work while on flight when he died in a plane crash at Douglas, Ariz. He was the first of Ivory Pine Co.’s 57 employees to lose his life in the armed forces. His brother, Dean, also in the service, and father, G.L. Elder of Williams, Ore., both former Ivory Pine employees, were informed of his death.

 

Enouf, Raymond

March 17, 1945, Iwo Jima

   Born in Klamath Falls on Oct. 15, 1925, Enouf attended public school here, and the Palo Alto Military Academy in Palo Alto, Calif. On his 17th birthday, with his mother’s consent, he enlisted in the Marines. Enouf was sent overseas in March of 1943, taking part in the battle of Guadalcanal. He later came home to recover from an illness, and once recovered was sent to the South Pacific in July of 1944, where he served as an ambulance driver during the battle of Iwo Jima. Enouf later volunteered for duty as a medic and died at the front lines at the age of 19.

   Enouf’s mother, Mrs. Pearl Foster of Klamath Falls, originally received word that her son was missing in action. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Estes, Elmer

Oct. 7, 1944, France

   Employed by Lamm Lumber Company at Modoc Point before his enlistment with the Army on Dec. 15, 1943, Estes began serving in Italy during the summer of 1944. He was serving with the 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division in France at the time of his death at the age of 37.

   His mother, Mrs. Anna Estes, and wife, Ann Estes, both of Klamath Falls, received word of his death. He was also survived by one brother, Kenneth Estes, also of Klamath Falls. Estes is buried at the Epinal American Cemetery in Epinal, France, and was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Feldner, Victor

Nov. 21, 1943, Gilbert Islands

   For six years prior to his enlistment, which was immediately after Pearl Harbor, Feldner lived in Chiloquin and worked at Blonglinger and Lamm Lumber company mills. Sent overseas with the Marines, he fought in the battle of Guadalcanal, and shortly before his death, at the age of 26, married his wife, Fay, in Christchurch, New Zealand.

   His mother, Mrs. Martha Feldner of Klamath Falls, received word of his death on Christmas Eve. Feldner was also survived by his father, of Donnybrook, N.D.,  four sisters and a brother. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Fenning, Harry

Jan. 16, 1945, France

   Born in Nebraska in 1924, Fenning was employed by Ewauna Box Company prior to his enlistment on Aug. 19, 1943. He was trained at Camp Van Dorn, Miss., and Fort Dix, N.J. He was shipped overseas in March, 1944, and was serving in France at the time of his death at the age of 21.

   Fenning was reported as missing in action for a month before his wife, Eleanor, received a telegram informing her of his death in combat. He was also survived by his 18-month-old daughter, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Fenning, all of Klamath Falls.

 

Fensler, Robert W.

March 1943, Burma

   Serving with the 425th Bomber Squadron, 308th Bomber Group, Heavy, Fensler was reported missing in flight over Burma.   His father, Clark Fensler of Tulelake, was informed of his death. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines.

 

Ferguson, Chester C.

Jan. 24, 1945, Luzon

   Also known as “Clair,” Ferguson was born April 7, 1924, in Cascade, Idaho. He attended school in Klamath County and Tennant, Calif., enlisting on June 23, 1943. He trained at Camp Roberts, Calif., and was sent overseas in December, 1943. Ferguson volunteered with the assault troops of the anti-tank division, 169th Infantry, 43rd Division, which participated in the invasion of Luzon, the Philippines. He was 20 at the time of his death.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chester Ferguson of Tennant, Calif., were informed by the War Department of their son’s death. Ferguson was also survived by two brothers, Robert Gadbois, with the Seabees, and Richard Ferguson of Seattle, Wash.

 

Fielder, John

Feb. 14, 1944

   Attending school in Klamath Falls, Fielder was a member of the National Guard before World War II. He enlisted with the Navy in June, 1941.

   His father, R.W. Fielder, of Oroville, Calif., and his sister, Mrs. Constance Badorek, of Klamath Falls, received notification from the Navy of his death.

   His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Fields, Glen

April 29, 1944, South Pacific

   Born June 7, 1912, Fields served as a seaman first class with the U.S. Navy.

   He was 31 years old at the time of his death.

   Fields’ mother, Mrs. Zeda Fields of Corning, Calif., was informed of her son’s death. He was also survived by a sister, Miss Stella Fields, of Sacramento.

   He was buried at Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, Calif.

 

Findholt, Charles Ole

Aug. 9, 1942, Cape Esperance

   Serving aboard the Bagley-class destroyer USS Jarvis, Findholt was reported as missing somewhere in the South Pacific in 1942. It was later learned that the Jarvis was sunk by Japanese aircraft off Guadalcanal on Aug. 9, 1942.

   Findholt was declared dead December, 1945, and his mother, Mrs. Beatrice Crowder of Pelican City, was informed of his death. He was 17.

   His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Fostick, Gene

July 17, 1944, Saipan

   Before entering the Marine Corps in 1943, Fostick was employed at Crane Mills in Bly. He received his basic training in California, and was sent overseas and served in the Marshall Islands before being sent to the Mariana Islands.

   His father, Joseph Fostick of Bly, and mother, Mrs. Zelia Fostick of Emmett, Idaho, were informed of his death in action. He was 18.

   He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart, and his mother was sent the Asiatic-Pacific Award.

 

Foubert, Rene

March 5, 1945, Iwo Jima

   Born in Grand Forks, N.D., Feb. 26, 1922, Foubert moved with his family to Klamath Falls in 1941. He was employed with the Great Northern Railroad as a machinist helper until Sept. 19, 1942, when he enlisted with the U.S. Marine Paratroops. When the paratroops was disbanded, he returned to Klamath Falls after 14 months of duty, seeing action on Bouganville, Guadalcanal and New Georgia islands. He married Mary Rose Deneault, of Klamath Falls, in Los Angeles on Sept. 2, 1944. Foubert returned to service with the Marines and died at the age of 23 on Iwo Jima.

   Foubert’s wife, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Foubert, all of Klamath Falls, were informed of his death.

 

Fykerude, Norman

Dec. 12, 1944, Belgium

   Born 1917 in Washington, Fykerude attended Fairview Elementary and Klamath Union High School. He also worked as a Herald and News paper carrier. Enlisting with the Army on May 8, 1942, Fykerude served with Company A, 33rd Armored Engagement Battalion.

   Fykerude was reported as missing in action in Europe in December of 1944. His wife, Aletha, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Fykerude, all of Raymond, Wash., were informed of his death. He was 27 years old.

   He was also survived by an infant daughter, whom he had never seen, and three brothers, Kenneth of Bend, Harry of New York City, and Glenn, of Raymond, Wash.

 

Garrett, Eugene

July 17, 1944, Port Chicago, Calif.

   Serving as a machinist on the ship Quinault Victory, Garrett was among 320 people killed by an explosion at the Port Chicago, Calif., ammunition depot. Port Chicago, located in the San Francisco Bay, was a naval depot, serving as a source of ammunition for the Pacific Theater.

   Garrett’s brother, Elmer, was also in the area of the explosion, but was not injured. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Garrett of Tulelake, were informed of their son’s death. He was 21.

 

Garten, George W.

May 1, 1945, Okinawa

   Born in Kansas, Garten attended schools in Tulelake and Klamath Falls before enlisting with the Marine Corps at the age of 15. He was later sent home for four months in the summer of 1943 on “underage” leave. Garten was recalled for active service with the Marines when he turned 17.

   He was in the Marines three years, serving on Guadalcanal, Pelileu, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. He also participated in other Marine Corps landings.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rod Garten of Portland, were informed of his death. He was 18.

 

Gess, Harold

Nov. 7, 1944, Holland

   Born in Idaho in 1922, Gess lived in Dairy and was a resident of Klamath County for 15 years prior to his enlistment on May 20, 1942. He served with Company C, 38th Infantry Battalion, 7th Armored Division.

   His grandmother, Mrs. Ella R. Gess of Dairy, was informed by the War Department of her grandson’s death. Gess’ twin brother, Gerald, was stationed at Camp Roberts, and another brother, Orville was serving in the Pacific. Gess was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and is buried at Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery at Henri-Chapelle, Belgium. Gess was 22.

 

Giles, Alfred D.

Aug. 17, 1944, France

   Born 1918 in Minnesota, Giles graduated from Chiloquin High School. Enlisting March 21, 1941, he served as a staff sergeant with the 191st Tank Battalion Armored Division. He fought in Africa and Italy before serving in France where he died at the age of 25.

   Giles parents, Mr. and Mrs. Darwin Giles of Chiloquin, were informed by a telegram from the War Department of their son’s death.

 

Gillette, Warren Clayton

Dec. 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor

   Serving aboard the USS Oklahoma, Gillette was among 429 officers, sailors and Marines to die aboard the battleship during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Dec. 7, 1941. He was 21 years old.

   His father, Roland Gillette of Klamath Falls, was informed of his death. Gillette was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Greear, Robert

Sept. 30, 1942, Philippines

   Born May 9, 1918, in Prairie City, Ore., Greear graduated from Chiloquin High School where he was captain of his basketball team, an all-state and all-star player. Greear enlisted in January 1940, and was shipped overseas April 27, 1940. He was originally stationed at Nichols Field on Luzon, but after the Dec. 7, 1941 Japanese attack, was returned to Bataan where he was taken as a prisoner of war.

   Greear died at the age of 25 in a Japanese prisoner of war camp in the Philippines. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. Earl Greear of Chiloquin, were notified of their son’s death. He was also survived by one brother.

 

Gregg, John Kenneth

June 30, 1945, South Pacific

   While living in Klamath Falls, Gregg worked for Beck’s Bakery, and the Shasta Food Market on Shasta Way as the store‘s manager. He enlisted from Klamath Falls and  served with the Navy aboard a minesweeper in the South Pacific, dying in an accident aboard ship at the age of 25.

   Gregg’s wife, of Bend, received word of her husband’s death in a telegram from the War Department. He was also survived by two young daughters, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Gregg of Bend, and three brothers who were also in the service. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Griffin, Lawrence

Oct. 8, 1944, France

   Born in Oregon in 1907, Griffin, a resident of Bly, enlisted with the Army on July 21, 1942. He served with General Patton’s Third Army, the 317th Infantry, 80th Division, and was stationed overseas for more than two years.

   Griffin’s wife received word of his death. He was also survived by four children, and his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. L.L. Griffin of Bly. Lawrence was the Griffins’ only son, dying at the age of 38.

 

Grisez, Reginald

August 1944, Florida

   Born and raised in Bonanza, Grisez enlisted in the Navy in 1943, shortly after his 17th birthday. He was training as a tail gunner in the naval air force when he was killed in a training accident at the age of 18.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Grisez of San Francisco, were informed of his death. He was also survived by his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J.O. Hamaker, of Bonanza.

 

Grossen, Howard Ernest

Aug. 17, 1943, North Africa

   While living in Klamath Falls, Grossen worked for Louis Eschle at the Quality Meat Market for nine years. He entered the Navy just before Christmas of 1942. Grossen served as a ships cook with the Seabees, dying of a gunshot wound at the age of 35.

   His wife, Hallie Grossen, received word from the War Department about his death.

 

Hamilton, Charles 'Bob'

April 29, 1943, North Africa

   Born in Oregon in 1919, Hamilton, known by friends and family as “Bob,” enlisted with the Army on Nov. 29, 1940, at Vancouver Barracks in Washington. Hamilton died at the age of 21 while serving in North Africa with the 6th Infantry, 1st Armored Division. He was reported as the Basin’s first war-time casualty from Northern Africa.

   His mother, Mrs. George Lamb, of Spring Lake was notified of his death. He was buried in the North Africa American Cemetery in Carthage, Tunisia, and was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Haney, William

May 2, 1945, Okinawa

   Attending school in Malin, Haney was later employed by Stone and Alderman in Malin. He worked for the Ewauna Box Company in Klamath Falls before entering the service in May, 1944. Haney graduated from Marine Corps infantry school at Camp Pendleton in Oceanside, Calif., and served overseas for seven months before his death.

   His wife, Bessie Haney, received word of her husband’s death from the War Department. He was also survived by a 3-year-old son, Robert Lee, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Haney of Gaston.

 

Hanlan, Kirk

Dec. 9, 1944, Fort Lauderdale Air Base, Fla.

   A graduate of Chiloquin High School’s class of 1944, Hanlan enlisted in the Navy in March 1944. The plane which he was serving on as a radioman crashed in the ocean near Fort Lauderdale Air Base, Florida. All members of the crew perished in the crash. Hanlan was 18 at the time of his death.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pete Hanlan of Chiloquin, were informed of their son’s death. He was also survived by two sisters, Patricia and Gaynel, both students at Chiloquin High School.

  

Hartley, Chad Reid

June 15, 1944, Saipan

   Attending school in Bonanza, Hartley was a resident of Klamath County for 15 years prior to his enlistment with the Marines in September, 1942. He received the Purple Heart after he was wounded in the Battle of Tarawa in November of 1943. He also received a Presidential Unit Citation.

   Hartley had been serving overseas for a year at the time of his death at the age of 22. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Hartley of Bonanza were informed of their son’s death. He was also survived by a brother, Robert Hartley, and two sisters, Elsa Hartley and Mrs. Gloria Wooten, all of Bonanza.

 

Hatfield, Gilbert

May 13, 1945, Italy

   Attending Klamath Union High School while living in Klamath Falls, Hatfield enlisted with the Army Air Corps on Feb. 23, 1940. He served with the 72nd Bomber Squadron, 450th Bomber Group, Heavy, and was the veteran of 48 missions over enemy occupied territory at the time of his death at the age of 28. He was originally reported as missing in action after his B-24 Liberator bomber crashed into the sea near the coast of Italy.

   Hatfield was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart, and the Air Medal with one Silver and one Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster, representing six additional awards of the same decoration.

   His wife, Mrs. Elsie Hatfield of Tucson, Ariz., was notified of his death. He was also survived by his mother, Mrs. Grace Wolford of Oakland, Calif., two sisters and two brothers. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Florence American Cemetery, Florence, Italy.

 

Heiber, Clinton

March 24, 1945, Luzon

   Born in North Dakota in 1918, Heiber was a former resident of Malin. He enlisted Sept. 30, 1942, in Sacramento, Calif., and served with the infantry, a member of the 33rd Division.

   His mother, Mrs. Inez Heiber of Red Bluff, was informed of his death. Heiber’s brother, Richard Heiber, died in the South Pacific five months previously. He was also survived by three sisters, Mrs. Louise Lyon of Malin, Mrs. Leon Sloan of Longview, Wash., and Myrna Heiber of Chico; three brothers, Kenneth Heiber, 19, who was then training with the Army Air Corps in Mississippi, Russell Heiber of Chico, and Duane Heiber of Red Bluff.

 

Heiber, Richard

Nov. 28, 1944, South Pacific

   Attending high school in Malin, Heiber was a resident of Klamath Falls for one and a half years. He enlisted from Klamath Falls in February of 1944 and was serving as a fireman second class on the carrier USS Essex at the time of his death at the age of 21.

   His mother, Mrs. Inez Heiber of Red Bluff, was informed of his death. Heiber’s brother, Clinton Heiber, was killed on Luzon while serving with the Army.

   Heiber was also survived by three sisters, Mrs. Louise Lyon of Malin, Mrs. Leon Sloan of Longview, Wash., and Myrna Heiber of Chico; three brothers, Kenneth Heiber, 19, Russell Heiber of Chico, and Duane Heiber of Red Bluff.

   He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and his name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines.

 

Herman, Raymond

April 24, 1945, Negros Island

   Born in Klamath Falls in 1919, Hermann enlisted with the Army Jan. 22, 1941 in Portland, Ore.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Hermann of Merrill were informed of their son’s death. Hermann was also survived by four sisters, Mrs. Gene Thomas, Mrs. Harold Shearer, Mrs. Russell Torgerson, all of Klamath Falls, and Mrs. Paul Dillard of Oakland, Calif.; two brothers, Robert Rankin who was working with Weyerhaeuser Camp 6, and Russell Hermann of Klamath Falls.

 

Hertager, Victor

Jan. 18, 1945, Solomon Islands

   Born in Klamath Falls on Nov.13, 1925, Hertager enlisted Feb. 15, 1943, and was sent overseas in July of that year for further training. He was assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 and took part in several major operations in the South Pacific.

   He was reported missing in January 17, 1944, when his plane crashed into Simpson Harbor at Rabaul. He was declared dead one year and one day later. He was 19 years old at the time of his death.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Heine Hertager of Prospect, Ore., were informed of his death. He was also survived by one brother, Henry, of Yreka, Calif., a brother, Arthur and sister, Mrs. Elsie Hasy, both of Prospect.

   He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and his name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, in Manila, Philippines.

 

Hetrick, George

Sept. 15, 1944, Italy

   Born in Nebraska in 1911, Hetrick was a resident of Klamath County for a year and a half before his enlistment on July 15, 1942, in Portland, Ore. He served with Company A, 133rd Infantry Regiment, 34th Infantry Division.

   Hetrick’s friends in Klamath Falls were informed of his death. He was 34 years old. Hetrick was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and was buried at the Florence American Cemetery in Florence, Italy.

 

Hitson, Charles

Feb. 3, 1943, North Atlantic

   Born in 1921 in Oregon, Hitson, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the Army on Aug. 8, 1942 in Portland, Ore.

   His father, H.E. Hitson of Langell Valley, was informed that his son died in the sinking of a transport ship in the North Atlantic. Hitson was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and his name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at East Coast Memorial, in New York City.

 

Hoerth, Leonard

Sept. 26, 1944, Central Pacific

   Born in South Dakota on March 9, 1924, Hoerth worked at Big Lakes Box Company in Klamath Falls before entering the service on July 21, 1943. He trained at Camp Adair and transferred to San Luis Obispo and Camp Beale before being sent overseas where he served with an anti-tank division for three months.

   Hoerth’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Hoerth of Klamath Falls, were informed their son drowned off an island in the Central Pacific. He was 20 years old.

   Hoerth was also survived by four sisters and five brothers.

 

Hollingsworth, Carl F.

Sept. 7, 1944, Near Mindinao

   Born in Boise, Idaho, Dec. 1, 1918, Hollingworth attended school in Boise and Keno and was employed by Weyerhaeuser before enlisting June 18, 1940. He trained at Hamilton Field, Calif., before going overseas Sept. 28, 1941. Hollingworth was taken by the Japanese as a prisoner of war at the fall of Corregidor and held on Mindanao in the Philippines.

   Hollingworth died at the age of 26, a prisoner of the Japanese, when the prisoner transport ship, the Shinyo Maru, was torpedoed. Of the 750 prisoners aboard the Shinyo Maru, only 83 survived.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Hollingworth of Klamath Falls, were informed by the War Department of their son’s death. Hollingworth was also survived by a brother, Ralph, who was serving with the Navy in the South Pacific.

 

Hopkins, Wallace

Feb. 16, 1943, Puget Sound

   While serving as a chief aviation pilot for the U.S. Navy Air Corps, Hopkins died at the age of 23 in a plane crash over the Puget Sound.

   His father, S.B. Hopkins of Klamath Falls, was informed of his death.

 

Horsley, Benjamin

July 5, 1943, Kingman, Ariz.

   Born Feb. 28, 1919, in Lakeview, Horsley lived in Klamath County for 13 years, graduating from Bonanza High School in 1937, and entering the service on Oct. 8, 1940. He served in Alaska for 15 months and was sent to Kingman Army Air Forces training field in Kingman, Ariz.

   Horsley, 24, was killed instantly when his plane crashed on a runway at the air field. He was reported as Klamath County’s 26th war casualty.

   His wife, Josephine Horsley of Kingman, Ariz., was informed of her husband’s death. He was also survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Horsley of Bonanza, one sister and three brothers.

 

Jerrue, Harold T.

Aug. 22, 1942, Southwest Pacific

   Born in Washington state in 1910, Jerrue enlisted in the Army on Feb. 24, 1941, in Tacoma, Wash. He served with the 162nd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Division, and was buried at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

   His mother, Mrs. Grace Jerrue of Klamath Falls, was informed of her son’s death.

 

Johnson, Harry

Sept. 17, 1944, Holland

   Born in Arkansas in 1920, Johnson was a former Klamath Union High School and Oregon State University student. He enlisted on July 6, 1942, completed his Army Air Forces advanced flying school training at Williams Field in Chandler, Ariz., and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He was stationed overseas in April of 1944, and was flying a P-38 that summer. He was a pilot of a Mustang P-51 at the time of his death at the age of 24.

   His wife, the former Rosemary Sloan of Klamath Falls, a senior at the University of Oregon, was informed her husband was missing over Arnheim, Holland, on Sept. 17, 1944, and was declared dead more than a year later.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Johnson of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death. Johnson received the Air Medal and Oak Leaf Cluster.

 

Johnson, Leon

Jan. 4, 1945, Europe

   Born Aug. 7, 1913, Johnson was a former employee of the Ivory Pine company in Bly serving with the U.S. Army Airborne Infantry. He died at the age of 31 while serving with the Army in Europe.

   His wife, Mrs. Myrtle Johnson of Kansas, and a former resident of Bly, received word of her husband‘s death..

  

Johnson, Meryl

May 25, 1945, Okinawa

   Born in North Dakota in 1926, Johnson attended school in Prineville, Long Creek and Tulelake, graduating from Merrill High School. He was working for Big Lakes Lumber Company in Klamath Falls at the time of his enlistment on Aug. 15, 1944. Johnson was transferred from the U.S. Army Air Force to the infantry and was sent overseas in January of 1945.

   His wife, the former Ileen Martin, received word of her husband’s death. Johnson was also survived by one child, his parents, Clint and Nina Johnson, two brothers and two sisters.

 

Johnston, Thomas

Dec. 26, 1942, Louisiana

   Born in California in 1919, Johnston, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on Feb. 2, 1942 in Portland, Ore. He served with the 340th Bomber Squadron and was killed in a plane crash in Louisiana nearly 11 months after his enlistment.

   His father, B.C. Johnston of Klamath Falls, was notified of his son’s death.

 

Kafton, Donald R.

May 14, 1945, Okinawa

   Born in Kansas in 1926, Kafton graduated from Klamath Union High School in 1944. He was a member of First Christian Church and was active in work through his church. Kafton was inducted on Aug. 15, 1944, and served with the 382nd Infantry Regiment, 96th Infantry Division.

   He was originally reported as missing in action three days before his mother, Mrs. Sarah Elona Kafton, of Klamath Falls, received official word of his death at the age of 19. He was also survived by a twin brother, three other brothers, and a sister.

   Kafton was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart and was buried at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Kangas, Lt. Wesley

April 22, 1945, Italy

   Attending Altamont Elementary School, and graduating from Keno High School in 1938, Kangas worked at the Boeing aircraft plant in Seattle, Wash., at the time of his enlistment. He was piloting a night fighter plane with the Fourth Airborne Division, stationed in Italy, when he was reported as missing in action on April 28, 1945.

   His wife, the former Anna Fine of Medford, received official word of her husband’s death in June of that year. Kangas was 23.

   He was also survived by a daughter, Sandra; parents, Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Kangas of Zenia, Calif.; a twin brother, Sidney, serving with the Navy in the South Pacific; another brother, Robert, also in the Navy; and grandmother, Mrs. Nora Long of Klamath Falls.

 

Karrer, Roy Norman

Dec. 8, 1943, Philippines

   Born on July 19, 1924, at Bonners Ferry, Idaho, Karrer, attended Pelican Elementary School and Klamath Union High School here. At the age of 14, he was the youngest member of the local National Guard. When he was 16, while working in Grants Pass, he joined the Oregon National Guard on Sept. 16, 1940, and went with Company C, 186th Infantry, to Fort Lewis, transferring to the anti-tank company. He later was transferred to the 194th tank battalion and was sent to the Philippines on Sept. 8, 1941, serving as a specialist third class, radio operator and machine gunner with the tank outfit.

   Karrer was taken by the Japanese as a prisoner of war at the fall of Bataan in April of 1942. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Karrer of Klamath Falls, was informed by the War Department on Jan. 30, 1943, that their son was a prisoner of war.

   His parents were informed by the International Red Cross in July of 1943 of his death in a prisoner of war camp in the Philippines. He was 18.

   Karrer was also survived by four younger brothers.

 

Ketchem, Winston

March 31, 1944, United Kingdom

   Reported as missing in action in Europe March 31, 1944, Ketchem, serving aboard a Navy PB4Y-1 bomber, was reported dead a year later. His father, William Castle Ketchem of Klamath Falls, received official notification of his son’s death from the secretary of the Navy.

   Ketchem was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal with Gold Star. A message from the Navy gave few details of his death.

   “Ketchem performed his essential duties with outstanding ability and zeal during day and night missions in defense of vital supply lines to European theaters of war,” the message read, “His unwavering devotion to duty throughout a period of intense operations was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States naval service. It is regretted that since the permanent citation contains certain information which at present is confidential, it must be held in the bureau until such time as the need for secrecy is past.”

   Ketchem’s plane took off from its base at Dunkeswell, England, to participate in an anti-submarine patrol the day he was reported missing.

 

Kruml, John

April 6, 1943, Pacific

   Born in Nebraska in 1915, Kruml a resident of Klamath County, enlisted on Nov. 7, 1941 in Portland, Ore. He was serving with the 165th Regiment, 27th Infantry Division at the time of his death at the age of 26.

   His father, John Kruml of Malin, was informed of his son’s death. Kruml was buried at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Laird, Jack

Feb. 26, 1944, Palmer Lake, Colo.

   Born in Oregon in 1919, Laird, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the Army Air Corps on Sept. 16, 1940. He was killed at the age of 24 in a plane crash near Palmer Lake, Colo.

   His wife, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Laird of Klamath Falls, were notified of his death. He was also survived by a brother.

 

Leslie, Donald V.

Dec. 15, 1944, France

   Born in 1917 in California, Leslie graduated from Klamath Union High School in 1937. He was employed at Shaw’s Stationery before enlisting on Oct. 28, 1941. The pilot of a B-26 with the 37th Bomber Squadron, 17th Bomber Group, medium, he had been overseas eight months, completing 33 missions, when he was reported as missing over France on Dec. 15, 1944.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Leslie of Compton, Calif., were informed of their son’s death. He was 27. Leslie was also survived by a brother, Roy Leslie, stationed at Camp Roberts, Calif. A cousin, Robert T. Leslie, was killed while serving in Italy on Oct. 1, 1944.

   Leslie was awarded the Air Medal with four Oak Leaf Clusters, and was buried at Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France.

 

Leslie, Robert T.

Oct. 1, 1944, Italy

   Born in Klamath Falls April 5, 1917, Leslie attended Fairview Elementary School, graduating from Klamath Union High School where he held the record in the 100-yard dash. Leslie attended one year at the University of California Los Angeles and transferred to Oregon State University, graduating in 1940. He worked for the California Oregon Power company while living in Klamath Falls and joined the Oregon State Police, living in Ashland for one year. He enlisted in the U.S. Army on Nov. 25, 1942, receiving his wings at Marfa, Texas, being commissioned as a second lieutenant. He also received additional training to fly as co-pilot on a B-24 Liberator.

   Leslie was originally reported as missing while flying a mission over Italy. He was 27.

   His wife, the former Virginia Hall of Arcadia, Calif., was informed of his death by the War Department. He was also survived by a 2 1/2-year-old son, Robert Timothy, his parents Mr. and Mrs. Maurice G. Leslie of Klamath Falls, and two sisters, Mrs. Gilbert Fleet and Virginia Lee Leslie both of Klamath Falls.

 

Lousignont, Vernon F.

Aug. 7, 1943, Sicily

   Born in Oregon in 1918, Lousignont, worked on the Charles Shuck ranch in Merrill for several years before his induction into the Army in Klamath Falls on July 10, 1941.

   He served in a North African campaign before his death at the age of 25 in Sicily.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tod Lousignont of Astoria, were informed of their son’s death. He was also survived by two brothers also in the military; Melvin, serving in North Africa, and George, who was stationed at CampWhite. He was also survived by a cousin, Mrs. Dave Liskey, of Klamath Falls.

 

Luce, Clarence

Jan. 13, 1944, Italy

   Entering military service with the U.S. Army from Oregon, Luce served with the 91st Cavalry Reconnaisance Squadron. He was 29 at the time of his death while serving in Italy.

   His wife, Alice Luce, of Klamath Falls, and father, L.E. Luce, also of Klamath Falls, were notified of his death.

   Luce was buried in the Sicily-Rome American Cemetery in Nettuno, Italy. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Marple, Charles

July 21, 1944, Guam

   A former employee of the Ewauna Box Co., Marple lived in Klamath Falls most of his life. He was serving with the Third Marine Division on the island of Guam at the time of his death at the age of 20.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.R. Marple of Sherwood, Ore., were informed of their son’s death.

   His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Mathes, Robert Allen

May 24, 1943, Alaska

   Born Dec. 20, 1919, Mathes enlisted with the Navy from Klamath Falls in September of 1941. He was serving as an aviation radioman in Alaska when his plane crashed. He was 23 years old.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Mathes of Smith Center, Kansas, were informed of their son’s death.

   Mathes was buried in the Sitka National Cemetery in Sitka, Alaska.

 

Mathews, Virgil

Dec. 1, 1943, South Pacific

   Mathews served as fireman third class with the U.S. Navy in the South Pacific.

   His father, Mr. G.E. Mathews of Chiloquin, and mother, Mrs. R.E. Cameron of North Bend, were notified of their son’s death.

   Mathews is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

McKeehan, James

Sept. 19, 1944, South Pacific

   A graduate of Henley High School’s class of 1939, McKeehan entered the service on Aug. 4, 1942.He served with the Coast Guard for 18 months, a little more than five months of that time overseas. He was originally reported as missing in action when he was knocked overboard while landing a supply boat on Baker Island in the South Pacific in heavy seas.

   He was declared dead by the War Department and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.O. McKeehan, were informed of their son’s death. He was 23.

   McKeehan’s shipmates collected $800, which was delivered to Henley High School principal Carrol Howe, with the instructions that it be used as a memorial to McKeehan at the school.

   His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

McManus, Warren R.

April 22, 1945, Germany

   Attending Fairview Elementary School in Klamath Falls, and Dorris High School in Dorris, Calif., McManus was employed by Cal-Ore before his enlistment on Nov. 12, 1940. He was stationed at Vancouver Barracks, Wash., Fort Lewis, Wash., Fort Ord, Calif., and later at Camp Pickett, Va. He was sent overseas with the third division and  participated in the invasions of North Africa, Sicily, Italy, France and Germany. In November of 1944 he was awarded his fifth Bronze Star.

   He was 20 at the time of his death.

   McManus’ family was notified of his death. He was survived by two sisters; Mrs. H.L. Fletcher of Forks, Wash., and Dorthy Holbrook of Medford; and a brother, Wildred McManus, serving with the Army Air Corps.

 

McMerrick, Charles

Oct. 25, 1943

   A former Copco power company employee, McMerrick served with the Seabees, dying at the age of 42.    His mother, Mrs. Alice McMerrick of Encanto, Calif., was notified of her son’s death.

 

McVittie, Ernest

Dec. 31, 1944, Japanese prison ship

   Living in Klamath County most of his life, McVitte attended local schools here. He served with the Marine’s Fourth Marine Regiment, M Company, Third Battalion.

   As a prisoner of the Japanese, McVitte was aboard the prisoner of war ship Oryoku Mari when it was bombed in Subic Bay, the Philippines. He was transferred the Japanese ship Brazil Mari, and died aboard the ship before it reached its next stop in Formosa.

   His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing, at the Manilla American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines.

 

Mitchell, Mark Austin

Oct. 26, 1943, South Pacific

   Born in Oregon in 1918, Mitchell enlisted Oct. 29, 1940, in San Francisco.

   He served as a tail gunner with the 529th Bomber Squadron, 380th Bomber Group, Heavy, dying during a mission over Moa Island near Timor. He was 24 years old.

   His father, E.M. Mitchell, of Oakland, Calif., was informed of his son’s death. Mitchell’s name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines. He was awarded the Silver Star, Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster and Purple Heart.

 

Moss, Ned

Aug. 26, 1944, France

   A longtime resident of Klamath County, Moss graduated from Klamath Union High School in 1933. He worked several years for Lamm Lumber Co. at Modoc Point and as a government house inspector before his enlistment on Feb. 2, 1944. He was sent overseas with an infantry unit in August of 1944. He was 28 at the time of his death.

   Moss’ wife, the former Juanita Rhoads of Medford, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Steve Moss of Klamath Falls, were informed of his death. He was also survived by an 8-year-old daughter, Ann.

   A Purple Heart medal was awarded posthumously to his parents.

 

Murray, William F.

June 25, 1944, France

   Attending grade school in Algoma and graduating from Klamath Union High School, Murray entered the Army in 1942, serving as a paratrooper.

   Murray was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star which was awarded to his mother, Mrs. Nance Murray during a ceremony at Fort MacArthur in San Pedro, Calif.

   Murray’s platoon, according to a citation for meritorious service in action, “... became cut off from friendly troops and was endangered by superior enemy fire. Pvt. Murray with complete disregard for his personal safety, volunteered to take a message to the remaining elements of his company and to guide them to the support of his platoon. Despite heavy enemy fire and the difficulty of the terrain, he delivered his message and guided the troops to the assistance of his platoon, thereby enabling them to continue the advance.”

   Murray, who died at the age of 27, was also survived by a young son, and a brother, who was stationed in New Zealand.

 

Muskopf, Richard F.

Deb. 6, 1942, Pacific Coast

   Born March 28, 1920, near Medford, Muskopf moved to Klamath Falls as a child with his family. He graduated from Klamath Union High School with the class of 1939, and enlisted Aug. 16, 1941. Muskopf was originally reported as missing, one of seven Army fliers aboard a bomber who were on a routine flight along the Pacific Coast of the United States.

   His wife, Bobbie Anderson of St. Louis, Mo., was informed by the War Department of his death. Muskopf was 22 years old. He was also survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Muskopf of Pelican City, a brother and a sister.

 

Muskrat, Harvey Robert

Jan. 28, 1945, Germany

   A resident of Klamath Agency, and a graduate of Chiloquin High School’s class of 1940, Muskrat attended Oregon State College for two years, received his commission and was called into service June 1, 1942. He received his wings at Ellington Field, Texas, on July 1, 1944, and was sent overseas in October of that year, being stationed in England with the 389th Bomb Group, flying as navigator aboard the B-24 Liberator, “Miss America.”

   Muskrat was originally reported as missing while on a mission to Dortmund, Germany, when his plane sustained damage from enemy anti-aircraft fire. Two crew members parachuted from the plane, but five were said to have been taken as prisoners by the Germans.

   His parents, Mr. And Mrs. H.R. Muskrat of Stewart, Nev., were informed of their son’s death nearly five months later. Muskrat received the Air Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Purple Heart.

 

Meyer, Joseph Harlan

April 8, 1945, Germany

   Born in South Dakota in 1919, Myer moved to the Malin area in 1941 and worked as a farm laborer. He enlisted on Jan. 21, 1944, and served with the 13th Infantry Regiment, 8th Infantry Division. He was reported as missing before his wife, Mrs. Eletha Myers of Kalina Courts in Malin, was notified of his death by the War Department. Myers was 26 at the time of his death.

   He was also survived by a son, Leslie, age 6, and a daughter, Dolores, age 7; his mother, Mrs. Angeline Myers of Lebanon; and six brothers. He was buried in the Netherlands American Cemetery in Margraten, Netherlands and was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Myers, Melvin J.

July 12, 1943, Philippines

Born Aug. 14, 1919, in Pasco, Wash., Myers and his family lived in North Bend for a short time before moving to Klamath Falls in 1932. He attended Klamath Union High School, joining the Oregon National Guard when that unit was mobilized as Battery A in 1940. In June of 1941 he was ordered to Fort McDowell, Calif., and as a member of Company K, 31st Infantry, was placed on active duty in The Philippines.

Myers was captured by the Japanese at the fall of Bataan in April of 1942. He survived the Bataan Death March, but died of starvation in a prisoner of war camp in the Philippines. He was 24.

Myers parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harley O. Myers of Klamath Falls, were notified of their son’s death. He was also survived by two sisters and two brothers.

 

Nelson, Robert

Feb. 25, 1945, Iwo Jima

   Born in Granger, Wash., May 2, 1920, Nelson moved to Tulelake with his family at the age of 15, graduating from Tulelake High School in 1939. He worked with his brother, Bill, farming in the Basin, at the time of his enlistment on Nov. 1, 1942. He served with the Marine Paratroops for 11 months and saw action in the battle for Bougainville. He returned home for five months when the paratroops were disbanded. Nelson joined the Marine Corps’ Fifth Division, and as an infantryman took part in the invasion of Guam. He was 24 at the time of his death on Iwo Jima.

   Nelson’s mother, Mrs. Viola Nelson of Tulelake, was informed by General A.A. Vandergrift, commanding officer of the Marine Corps, of her son’s death. He was also survived by a brother, a sister, and three half-brothers.

 

Nendel, James

Oct. 9, 1944, England

   Born in Oregon in 1922, Nendel attended the Altamont schools, graduating from Klamath Union High School in 1940. He was employed by Ewauna Box Co. at the time of his enlistment on March 19, 1943. He completed his training at El Paso, Texas, and was sent overseas in June of 1944, serving with the 857th Bomber Squadron, 492nd Bomber Group in England. Nendel died at the age of 22 from injuries sustained during a plane crash in Helmsfirth, England.

   Nendel’s wife, Irene Nendel of Klamath Falls, was notified of her husband’s death. He was also survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Nendel of Klamath Falls, two brothers and two sisters.

   He was buried in the Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England, and received the Air Medal while stationed in England.

 

Newsom, Don

April 6, 1945, Germany

   Born Sept. 19, 1914, in Prineville, Newsom attended high school in Portland, graduating in 1932. As a resident of Klamath County, he was employed by the California Oregon Power Co., and affiliated with the Oregon State Industrial Accident Commission at the time of his enlistment on April 22, 1942.

   Serving as a Technician Fourth Class with the Army’s 533rd Division Ordinance Maintenance Company, Newsom was sent overseas in February of 1944.

   Newsom’s wife, Ruth Newsom of Klamath Falls, was notified of her husband’s death. He was 30. Newsom was also survived by his mother, Mrs. Goldie Newsom, of Klamath Falls.

   He was buried at Lorraine American Cemetery, St. Avold, France.

 

Nord, Richard L.

June 5, 1943, South Pacific

   Born in Oregon in 1923, Nord a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on July 17, 1942.

   His mother, Mrs. Ivy Nord of Klamath Falls, was informed of her son’s death. He was 19.

 

Olson, Marshall

March 12, 1945, France

   Born in Wisconsin, Olson was a resident of Klamath County for 19 years. He attended school in Keno, and prior to his enlistment on April 28, 1944, was employed as a driver with Pat’s Cabs. He was familiarly known around town as “Happy.”

   As an infantryman in the U.S. Army, Olson was sent overseas Feb. 1, 1945, serving in France.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Anton Olson of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death. Olson was 33.

 

Pankey, Fred Landen

June 23, 1941, Altadena, Calif.

   Living in Klamath County most of his life, Pankey was a graduate of the University of Oregon. He was employed by Standard Oil Company at Chiloquin and Dorris before enlisting.

   Pankey served with the 77th pursuit squadron out of Hamilton Field, near Altadena, Calif. During a routine training flight from Muroc dry lake, Pankey, and pilot Lieut. Jesse K. Jackson, crashed on the slopes of Mount Lowe. Pankey was 32 at the time of his death.

   Pankey was survived by his bride of two weeks, Betty Heath Pankey of Sacramento, formerly of Fort Klamath, and his mother, Mrs. Maude Prindeville of Sacramento. He was also survived by his Uncle, Ivan Pankey of Sprague River, and third cousin Willis Pankey, deputy sheriff and constable at Bly. He was buried at Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, Calif.

 

Patterson, Ronald K.

Sept. 16, 1943, Guadalcanal

   Entering the Navy from Oregon, Patterson served aboard the carrier the USS Wasp. On Sept. 15, 1942, the USS Wasp was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine. Patterson, at the age of 24, was one of 193 crew members killed.

   Patterson was reported as missing on Oct. 21, 1942, and officially reported as dead on Sept. 16, 1943.

   His mother, Mrs. E.E. Patterson of Medford, was informed of her son’s death. He was also survived by a sister, Mrs. Phil Gustafson of Klamath Falls.

   Patterson was awarded the Purple Heart and his name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Patzke, Jack

April 8, 1945, Germany

   Born in Minnesota in 1924, Patzke graduated from Klamath Union High School and was employed by Crane Mills in Bly.

   He enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on Nov. 23, 1942, and was promoted to the rank of sergeant a few days before his 19th birthday. He received training in Florida and Texas, and was stationed at Scott Field, Ill., where he received his radioman training.

   He was serving with the 99th Bomber Group, 347th Bomb Squadron, when his plane was shot down on April 30, 1944, near Bologna, Italy. He was taken by the Germans as a prisoner of war, detained at Stalag Luft III Sagan-Silesia, Bavaria. In the winter of 1944, Patzke, along with 10,000 other allied prisoners, was forced on a 200-mile long march to a prisoner of war camp in Nuremberg. He was killed on the way to Nuremberg.

   Patzke’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Patzke of Bly, were informed of their son’s death.

   The Patzke family suffered further loss on May 5, 1945, when two other children in the family – Joan and Dick Patzke – were killed in the explosion of a Japanese balloon bomb in the Fremont National Forest.

 

Pollock, Claude

Oct. 9, 1944, Germany

   Born on April 28, 1921, in Mississippi, Pollock was employed locally by Wheeler Pine and Long-Bell Lumber Co. He enlisted with the U.S. Army on Nov. 10, 1942, serving with the 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division.

   Pollock’s wife, Phyllis Pollock of Klamath Falls was informed of her husband’s death. He was 23 years old. He was also survived by his mother, Mrs. Georgia Pollock of Merdant, Miss. He was buried at Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery in Henri-Chapelle, Belgium.

   Pollock was awarded the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, and the Purple Heart.

 

Pool, Walter

April 16, 1945, Luzon

   Born in Oregon in 1921, Pool, also known as “Bud,” graduated with the class of 1942 from Klamath Union High School. He enlisted with the U.S. Army on Sept. 29, 1942, and was sent overseas in July of 1943. He served in Hawaii, New Guinea, the Netherland East Indies, and Luzon.

   Pool’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pool of Klamath Falls, were informed on May 3, 1945, of their son’s death at the age of 23. The following day, the Pool’s were notified of the release of another son, John R. Pool, from a German prisoner of war camp. He was also survived by another brother, Clifford Pool, working as a civilian employee with the Arabian-American Oil Co. in Arabia; and a sister, Mrs. Jane Myers of Tulelake.

 

Potucek, Emil

Oct. 19, 1944, Germany

   Born in 1918 in the Malin area, Potucek graduated from Malin High School and owned and operated a farm in the area prior to his enlistment in September of 1942. He received his wings and commission on Jan. 7, 1943, at Fort Sumner, N.M., and was the first pilot on a B-17 Flying Fortress. He was sent overseas Aug. 1, 1943, serving with the 366th Bomber Squadron, 305th Bomber Group, Heavy.

   Potucek was reported missing when he failed to return from a mission over Germany. It was later learned he was wounded, and died while being held as a prisoner of war by the Germans. He was 26.

   Potucek’s wife, Marie Potucek of Malin, was informed of her husband’s death. He was also survived by his father, Joe Potucek Sr. of Bonanza; mother, Mrs. Anna Potucek of Malin; two brothers and three sisters.

   He was awarded the Air Medal and the Purple Heart.

 

Powers, Hollis Keith

June 25, 1943, Pomona, Calif.

   Born in California in 1912, Powers a former resident of Sprague River, enlisted with the U.S. Army on April 1, 1941.

   Powers was killed in a crash while on tank maneuvers near Pomona, Calif. He was 31 years old.

   His stepmother, Berndenia Powers of Stockton, Calif., was informed of his death.

  

Premo, Wesley

March 29, 1944, Pecos, Texas

   Born in Minnesota in 1922, Premo enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on Oct. 14, 1942.

   Premo was killed in a plane crash at the Army Air Field at Pecos, Texas.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilford J. Premo of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death.

 

Pritchard, Charles E. “Tommy”

Jan. 29, 1942, South Pacific

   Born in Texas in 1920, Pritchard, also known as “Tommy,” enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on April 29, 1941. He served as a bombardier while in the South Pacific.

   His father, J.F. Pritchard of Keno, was informed of his son’s death.

   Pritchard, who was 20 at the time of his death, was awarded the Air Medal and Purple Heart. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at the Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines.

 

Ray, John T.

Feb. 11, 1943, Walla Walla Air Base, Wash.

   Born in Idaho in 1915, Ray, also known as “Jack,” enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on Jan. 23, 1942.

   Ray was killed in a plane crash near Walla Walla Air Base.

   His mother, Mrs. J. Frank Adams of Merrill, was informed of her son’s death.

 

Reber, Ehle

Jan. 23, 1943, Europe

   Born in California in 1920, Reber, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on July 15, 1941.

   He served as a bomber pilot of a B-17 Flying Fortress dubbed “Jerry Jinx,” with the 427th Bomber Squadron, 303rd Bomber Group, Heavy based in England. A photo of Reber and the “Jerry Jinx” crew was printed in British newspapers and was used on the cover of the New York Times Magazine. Reber related to his parents in a letter home that his flying gear -- including fleece-lined jacket, boots, heavy coveralls, caps, parachutes and “Mae West” life preserver -- was so bulky he needed help getting into it.

   Reber was originally reported as missing over the Bay of Biscay following a raid over occupied Europe.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Reber of Malin, were informed of their son’s death. Reber was awarded the Air Medal and Purple Heart. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England. In 2011 the air field in Malin was renamed Ehle Reber Municipal Airport.

 

Reeder, Joseph Edward

March 31, 1943

   Born Aug. 28, 1917, in Alabama, Reeder, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the U.S. Army on Oct. 28, 1940.

   He was buried at Mobile National Cemetery, Mobile, Ala. He was 25 at the time of his death.

 

Reeves, Levi

Oct. 28, 1944, Leyte Island

   Born in Eugene in 1912, Reeves moved to Klamath Falls as a young boy. He was employed by the Patterson Paint store in Klamath Falls for four years before his enlistment with the U.S. Army on Jan. 21, 1944.

   He was serving with the Infantry, in the 96th Division, on Leyte in the Philippines when his family received word that he was seriously injured. Reeves died a few days later at the age of 32.

   His wife, Mrs. LeVerne Reeves of Klamath Falls, received word of her husband’s death through a War Department telegram. He was also survived by four children; his mother, Mrs. James Reeves of Klamath Falls; a sister, and two brothers.

 

Rhinevault, George

Oct. 21, 1945, Adriatic Sea

   Born in Oregon in 1925, Rhinevault lived in Klamath Falls for 18 years, attending local schools. He enlisted on Dec. 10, 1943, and was sent overseas in September of 1944, serving as a gunner on a B-24 Liberator bomber with the 783rd Bomber Squadron, 465th Bomber Group, Heavy.

   He was reported as missing while on a mission over the Adriatic Sea and North Africa.

   His mother, Mrs. Maude Conquergood of Bonanza, was informed of her son’s death. Rhinevault was awarded the Air Medal and Purple Heart. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at the Sicily-Rome American Cemetery in Nettuno, Italy.

 

Rhoads, Milton

March 2, 1945, Iwo Jima

   Born in Medford on Feb. 6, 1921, Rhoads moved to Klamath Falls with his parents when he was a young child, graduating from Klamath Union High School in 1940. He was employed by Rhoads Window Cleaning and was a member of the National Guard. He trained at Camp Pendleton, Oceanside, Calif., and Camp Elliot, San Diego, Calif., where he served for a while as an instructor.

   Rhoads fought in the Battles of Bougainville and Guam with the Marine Third Division. He served overseas for two years before his death at the age of 24 on Iwo Jima. He was originally reported as missing in action.

   Rhoads’ wife, Louise Rhoads of Vancouver, B.C., was informed of her husband’s death. He was also survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A.M. Rhoads of Klamath Falls; five brothers and two sisters.

   He was awarded the Purple Heart and his name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Ristine, Tyrus C.

Aug. 12, 1944, Italy

   Born in Cainsvile, Mo., on March 12, 1911, Ristine, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the U.S. Army on Oct. 3, 1942.

   He was serving with the 362nd Infantry, 91st Division at the time of his death at the age of 33.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.G. Ristine of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death.

 

Roberts, William

Oct. 11, 1941, China Sea

   Born in 1911, Roberts lived in Klamath County for nine years and was employed at a lumber camp before his enlistment on July 28, 1941.

   He was serving with the Army’s 31st Infantry Regiment when he was captured by the Japanese on Corregidor. He was held in a prisoner of war camp on Cabanatuan in the Philippines until October of 1944, when he was among 1,775 prisoners transported aboard the Japanese ship the Arisan Maru. The Arisan Maru was torpedoed by an American submarine approximately 200 miles off the coast of China. Only five prisoners escaped. Roberts was 22 years old.

   Roberts’ father, Colin Floyd Roberts, of Bonanza, was informed of his son’s death. He was also survived by a sister and a brother, both of Bonanza.

   Roberts’ was awarded the Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster, and the Purple Heart.

 

Rogers, James

Oct. 31, 1941

   A resident of Merrill, Rogers served as a seaman, first class with the U.S. Navy.

   His mother, Mrs. Anne Rogers of Orange, Calif., was informed of her son’s death. He was 31.

   Rogers’ name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing, at Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge England. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Roofner, Joe Francis

July 18, 1943, Solomons

   Serving as a motor machinist’s mate second class in the Navy, Roofner was aboard a tank landing ship, the USS-LST 342, when it was torpedoed and sunk by the Japanese in the Solomon Islands. He was originally reported as missing in action.

   Roofner’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Frank Roofner of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death at the age of 23.

  

 

Russell, Clifford B.

Aug. 14, 1944, France

   Born in Bozeman, Mont., on Aug. 7, 1919, Russell moved to Fort Klamath with his parents where he graduated from Fort Klamath High School. Before enlisting in the Air Corps on July 9, 1940, he was employed in the woods by Pelican Bay Lumber Co.

   He received his training in Talahassee, Fla., and was the pilot of a P-47 Thunderbolt with the 510th Fighter Squadron, 405th Fighter Group stationed in England.

   Russell’s mother, Mrs. Katy Russell of Klamath Falls, originally received word that her son was missing in action while on a mission. He was 25.

   He was also survived by a brother and seven sisters.

   Russell was buried in the Normandy American Cemetery, in Colleville-sur-Mer, France, and was awarded the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Purple Heart.

 

Rustt, Norman Kenneth

Nov. 8, 1942, South Pacific

   A resident of Klamath Falls, Rustt was serving as a bombardier with the Navy Air Corps in the South Pacific at the time of his death at the age of 19.

   His mother, Mrs. T.B. Rivers of Klamath Falls, was informed of her son’s death.

 

Salsbery, Walter

Dec. 11, 1942, Colorado Springs, Colo.

   Born Jan. 27, 1922, in Glendale, Calif., Salsbery graduated from Klamath Union High School with the class of 1940, where he was listed as an outstanding member of the Pelican football squad. He enlisted on Aug. 27, 1940, receiving his pilot’s training at the advanced flying school at Williams Field, Ariz. He was on an assignment, piloting a P-38 as a member of the 10th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, Second Photographic Group at Colorado Springs, Colo., when his plane crashed. He was 20 years old.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Salsbery of Klamath Falls, were advised of their son’s death. He was also survived by two brothers.

 

Santo, Hubert

March 8, 1945, Philippines

   Born on Dec. 21, 1918, in Walla Wala, Wash., Santo graduated from Medford High School with the class of 1938, and was an employee of the California Oregon Power Co. in Klamath Falls before his enlistment on April 3, 1941.

   He served in the South Pacific for almost  four years at the time of his death at the age of 26.

   His brother, Charles M. Santo of Klamath Falls, was informed by the War Department of his brother’s death.

   Santo was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action in the taking of the Munda Air Field.

 

Sauer, Paul John

June 13, 1945

   Sauer, a resident of Klamath Falls, served with the U.S. Marine Corps.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Alvin A. Sauer, of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death.

 

Schatz, Theodore

Nov. 29, 1943, Germany

   Born in Michigan in 1917, Schatz, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Forces on Aug. 11, 1942. He was flying with the 548th Bomber Squadron, 385th Bomber Group, Heavy, over Germany at the time of his death at the age of 26.

   His wife, Charlotte Schatz of Klamath Falls, was notified of her husband’s death. He was also survived by his father, Leslie Schatz of Tiller, Ore.

   Schatz was buried at Ardennes American Cemetery, Neupre, Belgium. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Schultz, Norris

Jan. 10, 1945, Luzon

   Born in Loma, N.D., on Oct. 24, 1924, Schultz was employed by Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. in Klamath Falls. He enlisted on June 19, 1943, and trained at Camp Roberts, Calif. He was serving with the 169th Infantry Regiment, 43rd Infantry Division on Luzon at the time of his death at the age of 20.

   His mother, Mrs. Inger Schultz of Klamath Falls, was informed of her son’s death. He was also survived by two sisters and five brothers. He was buried at the Manila American Cemetery, in Manila, the Philippines and was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Sehorn, Lavon “Bill”

Aug. 3, 1944, Naper, Neb.

   Born Oct. 17, 1921, in Stapp, Okla., Sehorn graduated from Klamath Union High School with the class of 1941. He enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on Feb. 8, 1942, and received his training at Missoula, Mont., LaMoore Field, Calif., and Luke Field, Ariz. He was newly reassigned to Bruning Army Air field near Naper, Neb. When the c-47 transport plane he was aboard crashed. Sehorn was one of 28 men killed in the crash. He was 23 years old. Reports indicated the plane was caught in an electrical storm and appeared to catch fire after a flash of lightning.

   Sehorn’s wife, the former Alice Simpson, was with him in Bruning when she was informed of her husband’s death. He was also survived by a 20-month-old son; his parents, Mr and Mrs. John F. Sehorn of Klamath Falls, and four brothers. He was buried at Klamath Memorial Park.

 

Semon, Charles

June 6, 1944, France

   Born in Klamath County on June 22, 1920, Semon attended grade and high schools at Henley, going on to graduate in 1938 from Oregon State College, majoring in agriculture. He enlisted in February of 1942, volunteering for the paratroops. He took his officers’ training at Fort Benning, Ga., and was assigned to Company F of the 506th Paratroop Infantry Regiment of the Army’s 101st Airborne Division. Semon was stationed in England in September of 1943, and died during the 1944 D-Day invasion of Normandy when his unit jumped inland of the Utah Beach sector.

   In a letter home shortly before his death, Semon reassured his father of the work before him, “Dad, you raise the spuds, and we’ll do the fighting.”

   Semon’s father, State Rep. Henry Semon, and his mother, Mrs. Henry Semon, both of Henley, received word of their son’s death on what would have been his 24th birthday. A letter from Semon’s regimental commander revealed he had drowned, his body was recovered and buried in a parachute in an American cemetery.

   Semon was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Sevcik, John P.

1943, Philippines

   Born June 20, 1911, in Spokane, Wash., Sevcik graduated from Klamath Union High School in 1929, going on to attend the University of Notre Dame, and New Mexico School of Mines.

   In 1940 he took a position as a mining engineer with a company in the Philippines, accompanied by his wife, Esther. At the outbreak of the war Sevcik enlisted with the U.S. Army Engineers, serving with Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Sevcik, his wife, and infant son, Alan Laird, were taken by the Japanese as prisoners of war sometime after the fall of Corregidor and Bataan in 1942. The family was separated, going to different prisoner of war camps in the Philippines.

   In 1944, Sevcik’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Sevcik of Klamath Falls, were informed by a woman who had been imprisoned with Esther Sevcik, that their son died of cerebral malaria in a prison camp some time in 1943, and that their 2-year-old grandson died in July of 1943 of typhoid pneumonia. Esther Sevcik was later released as a prisoner of war.

 

Sexton, Joseph Francis

August 1942, South Pacific

   Serving as a Seaman, Second Class aboard the Navy destroyer the USS Jarvis, Sexton was reported as missing after his ship was attacked by Japanese aircraft off Guadalcanal in August of 1942.

   Sexton’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sexton of Klamath Falls, were officially informed of their son’s death in December of 1945. He was 22 years old at the time of his death.

   Sexton’s name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing, at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines. Sexton was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Sexton, Stanley D.

Oct. 9, 1945, Okinawa

   A graduate of Klamath Union High School’s class of 1940, Sexton enlisted with the Navy on July 14, 1944. He was sent overseas in May of 1945, serving as a motor machinist’s mate third class.

   Sexton’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Sexton of Klamath Falls, were informed by a War Department Telegram that their son was killed in a typhoon on Okinawa. He was 23.

   Sexton was also survived by his wife, Irene Sexton of Klamath Falls, and a 3-year-old daughter, Bonnie Bell.

   Sexton’s name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing, at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Shadduck, Robert

Sept. 23, 1944, Palau Islands

   Born Feb. 25, 1925, in Wyoming, Shadduck lived most of his life in Klamath Falls, attending grade schools and Klamath Union High School here. He enlisted with the Army on Oct. 12, 1943, receiving his basic training at Camp Adair near Corvallis. He was serving with the 322nd Infantry Regiment, 81st Infantry Division on the Palau Islands at the time of his death at the age of 19.

   Shadduck’s parents, Maurice and Stella Shadduck of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death. He was also survived by two brothers and one sister, all of Klamath Falls. He was buried at the Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines and was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Shadley, Walter

Feb. 20, 1945, Luzon

   Born in Oregon, Shadley, a Klamath County resident, enlisted with the Army on Sept. 29, 1942.

   Shadley’s wife, Pearl Shadley of Sprague River, was notified of her husband’s death. He was also survived by his mother, Mrs. Rosa Shadley of Sprague River; three sisters, Mrs. Nettie Shough of Trail, Ore,, Mrs. Pearl Rogers of Sprague River and Mrs. Melvina Frazier of Tulelake; five brothers, Lee, of Chico, Calif., Fred, who was stationed in Florida, Albert and Amos of Trail, Ore., and Edwin of Vale, Ore.

 

Smith, Albert

Oct. 24, 1944, Japanese prison ship

   Born in Idaho in 1919, Smith lived in Klamath Falls and Bonanza from the age of 7, attending grade and high schools at Bonanza. He enlisted on July 30, 1940, and was assigned to the 3rd Quartermaster Regiment, serving in the South Pacific. Smith was taken as a prisoner of war on Corregidor and was held by the Japanese on Cabantuan until Oct. 11, 1944, when he, along with 1,775 other prisoners, was placed aboard the Japanese ship the Arisan Maru. The Arisan Maru, torpedoed by an American submarine, sunk approximately 200 miles off the coast of China. Only five prisoners escaped.

   Smith’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome E. Smith of Crescent City, were informed of their son’s death. He was 24.

   Smith’s name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Smith, Alfred G.

1943, Japanese prison

   Born in Idaho in 1921, Smith, a resident of Klamath County, enlisted with the Army at Fort Stevens, Ore., on May 8, 1941. While serving with the infantry in the South Pacific, he was taken as a prisoner of war by the Japanese at Corregidor. Smith was imprisoned at Camp Shinjuku in the Tokyo Bay area where he later died.

   Smith’s father, Alfred D. Smith of Klamath Falls, was notified of his son’s death. He was buried at the Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines, and was awarded the Silver Star and Purple Heart.

 

Smith, Irwin

Oct. 30, 1945, France

   Serving with the Army’s corps of military police in France, Smith died in a German hospital from a gunshot wound.

   Smith’s father and mother, Hugh Elden Smith and Lorena Crain of Beatty, were informed by the War Department of their son’s death.

 

Snapp, Charles

March 3, 1945, Mountain Home, Idaho

   Born in South Dakota in 1924, Snapp moved with his family to the Merrill area in 1939. He enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on Oct. 8, 1943, and served as an engineer aboard a B-24 Liberator bomber.

   Snapp was one of a crew of nine men killed in a plane crash at Mountain Home, Idaho. He was 20 years old.

   Snapp’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Snapp of Merrill, were informed by the War Department of their son’s death. Snapp was also survived by five brothers.

   A full military funeral was accorded to Snapp at Linkville Cemetery by 40 men with the Klamath Falls Marine Barracks. Snapp’s was the first military funeral conducted in Klamath Falls by the Marine Barracks.

 

Spence, John

Nov. 20, 1943, Gilbert Islands

   A resident of Chiloquin four years before his enlistment with the Marine Corps in March of 1941, Spence served through the entire Guadalcanal Campaign.

   Spence’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Spence of Chiloquin, were informed on Christmas Eve of their son’s death. He was 23 years old.

   Spence’s name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Spencer, Albert

Oct. 25, 1945, Philippines

   Serving as a motor machinist’s mate first class with the Navy in the Philippines, Spencer died in a plane crash on Samar Island.

   Spencer’s parents, Mr. And Mrs. Dean Spencer of Redmond, were informed of their son’s death.

 

St. John, James

Dec. 16, 1944, Luxembourg

   Born in Idaho in 1924, James St. John graduated from Bly High School with the class of 1942. He enlisted in the Army on June 18, 1943, and attended Signal Corps Radio schools in Boise, Idaho, and San Jose, Calif.

   St. John was assigned to the 110th Infantry Regiment, 28th Infantry Division, Company I in the European theater. He was killed in Weiler, Luxembourg, during the Battle of the Bulge.

   St. John was survived by his sister, Maxine Patzke, and two nephews, Gary and Jim Patzke, all of Klamath Falls, and a niece, Susan Creel, of Corvallis.

 

Stallard, Lorenzo

Dec. 26, 1944, Belgium

   Living for many years in Merrill, where his mother and step-father operated the Palm Cafe, Stallard, familiarly known as “Len,” worked for Baker Brothers in Klamath Falls before enlisting with the Army on Jan. 25, 1944. He trained at Camp Roberts, Calif., and was sent overseas Aug. 10, 1944, serving with the 333rd Infantry Regiment, 84th Infantry Division. Stallard was believed to have been with the First Army in December of 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge.

   Stallard’s wife, Mrs. Marjorie Stallard of Klamath Falls, was informed by the War Department of her husband’s death. He was 30.

   He was also survived by his father, Chester Stallard of Drewsy, Ore., and step-father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Charles and Jo Card of Tulelake.

   He was buried at the Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium, and was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Steinseifer, Ernest

Feb. 24, 1944, Germany

   Born in 1923, Steinseifer, enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Forces from Klamath Falls on Nov. 12, 1942. Serving as a radio operator with the 702nd Bomber Squadron, 445th Bomber Group, Heavy, Steinseifer was originally declared missing when his plane crashed near Bechlingen, Germany. He was 20 years old.

   Steinseifer’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. Steinseifer of Tacoma, Wash., were informed of their son’s death. He was buried at the Ardennes American Cemetery, Neupre, Belgium, and was awarded the Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, and Purple Heart.

 

Stephenson, George W.

July 2, 1943, South Pacific

   Serving with the Navy Seabees, Stephenson was one of the first Seabees officers to die during World War II. Camp Stephenson-Lee on the East Coast was said to have been named in his, and another officer’s honor.

   Stephenson’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Stephenson of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death. His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Stueben, Charles

Nov. 25, 1944, Los Angeles

   Steuben was born June 13, 1915, and served in the U.S. Army. He died at Los Angeles, Calif., at the age of 29.

   His parents, Otto Steuben and Lena Van Dahlen, were notified of their son’s death. He was also survived by a sister, Norma Frimmel.

 

Sundberg, Alex

March 26, 1944, Holland

   Born in Minnesota in 1917, Sundberg, was employed locally by Kesterson Lumber Co. before his enlistment on May 14, 1942. He was serving as a turret gunner with the 453rd Bomber Squadron, 323rd Bomber Group, Medium, when he was reported as missing in action over Holland.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs.Nels Sundberg of Klamath Falls, received word from the War Department of their son’s death. The War Department received word about Sundberg from the German government through the International Red Cross. He was also survived by three sisters and six brothers.

   Sundberg was 26 at the time of his death, and was buried at the Netherlands American Cemetery in Margraten, Netherlands. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Taber, Don

May 20, 1943, Garden City, Kan.

   Born in California in 1921, Taber enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Corps on May 14, 1942. He died in a basic trainer crash at Garden City, Kansas.

   His father, Roy Taber of Yreka, was informed of his son’s death.

 

Thew, Richard Ridley

Feb. 16, 1943, South Pacific

   Born Nov. 18, 1917, in Los Angeles, Calif., Thew, a resident of Langell Valley, served as a fire controlman first class aboard the Navy submarine the USS Shark. The Shark was presumed lost in February of 1942 following a Japanese attack in the South Pacific. Thew was 25.

   Thew’s father, Dick Thew of El Monte, Calif., was informed of his son’s death.

   Thew’s name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Thomas, Charles

July 8, 1945, Hawaii

   Born in Klamath Falls in 1925, Thomas was educated in local schools and enlisted with the Army on Sept. 23, 1943. He served on Guam, Leyte, Io Shima and Okinawa with the 77th Infantry Division, Second Battalion. Thomas was wounded while serving with a medical detachment, bringing in battlefield casualties on Okinawa. He died of his wounds nearly two months later on Hawaii. He was 20 years old.

   His mother, Mrs. George Bell, of Klamath Falls, received word from the War Department of her son’s death. He was also survived by a brother, Lindy Thomas, and a sister, Grace Bell. He was awarded a Combat Badge, Good Conduct Medal, and the Purple Heart.

 

Thomas, Willie

Nov. 27, 1944, Leyte

   Born in Oklahoma in 1922, Thomas was employed by Pelican Bay Lumber Co. before his enlistment with the Army on April 7, 1943. He trained with the infantry at Camp Beale, Calif., before receiving his overseas orders in October of 1943. He fought in New Guinea and the Dutch East Indies before being sent to the Philippines. He was 22 at the time of his death.

   Thomas’ wife, Pauline Thomas of Manzanita, Ore., was informed of her husband’s death. Thomas was also survived by a daughter, Barbara Kay, of Manzanita; mother, Mrs. Rosa B. Thomas of Pelican City; four brothers and five sisters.

 

Thornton, Luther

March 7, 1945, Iwo Jima

   Enlisting with the Marine Corps in the fall of 1941, Thornton, a resident of Klamath Falls, served overseas for 26 months, taking part in the battle for Bougainville and the invasion of Guam. He was awarded the Silver Star from Fleet Admiral William Halsey on Nov. 1, 1943, for meritorious action on Bougainville.

   Thornton’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Foster Thornton of Klamath Falls, were informed by a telegram from Gen. A.A.Vandergrift of their son’s death. The telegram stated that Platoon Sgt. Thornton “was killed in performance of duty and the service of his country.”

   He was also survived by three brothers.

 

Tracy, Earl

March 31, 1945, Luzon

   Born in 1920, and a lifelong resident of Klamath County, Tracy was employed at Kalpine Plywood Co. prior to his enlistment with the Army on June 8, 1944. He trained at Camp Wolsters, Texas, before reporting for overseas duty with Company K of the 32nd Infantry.

   Tracy’s wife, Mrs. Rose Tracy of Klamath Falls, was informed by the War Department of her husband’s death. He was 26 years old. He was also survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. L.E. Tracy of Weed.

 

Tucker, William

March 1, 1945, Luzon

   Born July 21, 1925, in in Idaho, Tucker was a student of Klamath Union High School before being inducted into the Army on Oct. 20, 1943. He received his basic training at Camp Roberts, Calif., reporting for overseas duty in April of 1944. He first served on New Guinea, and was later sent to the Philippines.

   Tucker was originally reported as wounded in action on Luzon Feb. 27, 1945.

   His mother, Mrs. Frank Forrer of Klamath Falls, was notified of her son’s death. He was 20 years old.

   Tucker was buried at Golden Gate National Cemetery in San Bruno, Calif.

 

Turner, Donald F.

June 6, 1944, France

   Born in Kansas in 1921, Turner graduated from Woodland High School in Woodland, Wash. He later worked as a linotype operator for the Milwaukie review in Milwaukie, Ore. As a resident of Klamath County, he enlisted with the Army on Jan. 21, 1942, and was sent overseas, stationed in England, in November of 1943.

   Turner served with the 743rd Tank Battalion, First Light Armored Forces during the D-Day invasion of Normandy. He was 22 at the time of his death.

   His mother, Mrs. John Hales of Klamath Falls, was informed of her son’s death. Turner was also survived by two stepbrothers.

   Turner was buried at Golden Gate National Cemetery, San Bruno, Calif.

 

Van Meter, William Theo

Aug. 22, 1944, South Pacific

   Employed by the Ewauna Box Co. in Klamath Falls prior to his enlistment in April of 1942, Van Meter received his basic training at San Diego, Calif. He was transferred to Dahlgren, Va., where he graduated as an aviation ordnance man. He was sent to serve in the South Pacific in March of 1943.

   Van Meter was posthumously awarded the Air Medal. His citation read: “For Meritorious achievement in aerial flight as Liberator bombardier in action against enemy Japanese surface forces in the Pacific war area on August 22, 1944. Determined and courageous in the performance of duty, Van Meter immediately manned his battle station when a Japanese cargo vessel was sighted deep in enemy waters and, accurately releasing his bomb load as his pilot dove on the target, succeeded in sinking the hostile craft. Van Meter’s expert technical skill and indomitable fighting spirit in the face of grave peril were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States naval service.”

   Van Meter’s father, Mr. Albert Van Meter of Klamath Falls, was informed of his son’s death. He was also survived by a brother and two sisters. Van Meter was 32 years old.

 

Wann, Daniel

March 1, 1945, Iwo Jima

   Born in Klamath Falls on July 15, 1920, Wann lived with his family in Sprague River where his father was a partner in Wolford and Wann, a pioneer Sprague River store. He enlisted with the Marine Corps in June of 1940, serving in the South Pacific.

   Wann’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Wann, of Roseburg, were informed by the War Department of their son’s death.

   Wann was 24 years old at the time of his death and was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. He was buried at Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

Ward, Joseph

Oct. 27, 1943, Italy

   Born in Kansas in 1898, Ward, a City Street Department employee, enlisted with the Army on Aug. 7, 1942, serving with the U.S. Army Engineers.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Ward of Kansas City, Mo., were informed of their son’s death. Ward was also survived by his former wife, Dorothea Ward, of Klamath Falls. He was buried at the Sicily-Rome American Cemetery, Nettuno, Italy.

 

Watts, John T.

May 27, 1944, Camp Kearney, Calif.

   A lifelong resident of Klamath County, Watts, entered the service in September of 1941, serving as an aviation radioman first class with the Navy.

   He was killed in a bomber crash near Camp Kearney, Mesa Auxiliary Station, Calif.

   His uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. J.O. Watts of Bly, were informed of their nephew’s death. Watts was 27 years old.

 

Wells, Richard W.

Nov. 8, 1944, Luzon Strait

   Graduating from Klamath Union High School with the class of 1942, Wells enlisted with the Navy from Klamath Falls on Jan. 18, 1943. He was reported as missing during his fourth month overseas while serving on his third patrol as torpedoman’s mate third class aboard the U.S. Submarine Shark. The Shark was credited with sinking six enemy vessels.

   Wells’ parents, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Robert Wells of Klamath Falls, received official word of their son’s death a year later from the Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal. Wells was 21 years old.

   His name is listed on the Tablets of the Missing at Manila American Cemetery, Manila, the Philippines. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Werner, Albert J.

June 8, 1944, Italy

   Born in Oregon in 1917, Werner was employed locally by Lamm Lumber Co. before enlisting with the Army on Nov. 18, 1940. He trained at Fort Lewis, Wash., and Fort Ord, Calif., and served with the 10th Engineer Combat Battalion, Third Infantry Division. He fought in North Africa and Italy, receiving the Purple Heart for wounds received on the Anzio beachhead. He rejoined his company shortly before his death.

   Werner’s father, Francis Albert Werner of Sacramento, and two sisters, were informed of his death. Werner was also awarded an Oak Leaf Cluster. He was buried in the Sicily-Rome American Cemetery in Nettuno, Italy.

 

White, Marvin

March 30, 1945, Pacific area

   Graduating from high school in Meridian, Kansas, White went on to graduate from the University of Wyoming. He trained as a pilot at the Air Corps training center, Victorville Army Flying School, near Victorville, Calif. He was serving overseas with the 99th Squadron when he died on a mission.

   In a letter written to his parents a week before his death, White explained some of his experience:

   “You no doubt have been reading of the B-29 blitz on Japan’s leading industrial cities. I believe they certainly looked successful while flying over them. Cities of over 1,000,000 people engulfed by flames is a sight to behold. One does not think of the panic stricken people below, because they are doing their damnedest to knock you down at that time. We have all been quite fortunate thus far on our raids...

   “This Iwo Jima invasion was quite a bloody battle from all indications. We flew over it several nights when going to Japan and you could see the guns blazing down on the island from one end to the other...

   “It is quite fatiguing to fly those missions. Five of them in ten days – a total of about 15,000 air miles and almost every mile over water.”

   White was awarded the Purple Heart.

 

Wiechmann, Harry

March 4, 1944, South Admiralty Islands

   Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on March 7, 1906, Wiechmann lived in Klamath Falls for more than eight years, working as a serviceman for Heilbronner Fuel Co. He was a member of the Klamath Falls Elks Lodge. He enlisted with the Navy on Oct. 5, 1942, and trained at Davisville, R.I.

   Wiechmann was serving as a chief ship fitter with the Seabees somewhere in the South Pacific at the time of his death at the age of 37.

   Wiechmann’s mother, Mrs. Freida Spatzier of New York City, was informed of her only son’s death. He was also survived by his cousin, Fred Heilbronner of Klamath Falls.

 

Wilkins, Walter Jr.

Sept. 1, 1942, Fort Benning, Ga.

   Born in Nebraska in 1920, Wilkins enlisted with the Army from Klamath Falls on Sept. 16, 1940. He was serving as a paratrooper at the time of his death.

   His father, W.W. Wilkins Sr., of Adin, Calif., was informed of his son’s death. He was also survived by a sister, Mrs. C.E. Allenby of Klamath Falls.

 

Willkinson, Carter D.

March 3, 1945, Isle of Skye

   Born in Richmond, Calif., on April 25, 1923, Wilkinson graduated from Tulelake High School with the class of 1941. He enlisted with the U.S. Army Air Forces on March 26, 1942, training at Ontario, Calif. Wilkinson was on his way to England, serving as a B-17 tail gunner when his plane crashed on the Isle of Skye, just off of Scotland. He was 21 years old.

   Wilkinson’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Noble C. Wilkinson of Tulelake, were informed of their son’s death. He was also survived by a brother and a sister. Wilkinson was buried at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in St. Louis, Mo.

 

Wilson, Albert L.

Sept. 17, 1943, Norfolk, Va.

   An explosion at the training station at  Norfolk, Va., Naval Air Station claimed Wilson’s life.

   Wilson’s mother, Mrs. Pearl Burk of Klamath Falls, was informed of her son’s death.

 

Wilson, Kenneth
Dec. 26, 1943, California coast

   Known as an outstanding athlete at Klamath Union High School, Wilson later enlisted with the U.S. Marine Corps. He was training as a pilot in an Avenger torpedo bomber when he died in a collision off of the California coast. He was 22 years old.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Wilson of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death.

 

Yeoman, John Wilbur

June 6, 1943, Marfa, Texas

   Born in Washington in 1918, Yeoman enlisted with the Army from Klamath Falls on Sept. 16, 1940. While training as an aviation cadet, he was killed in a plane crash at Marfa, Texas.

   His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Yeoman of Klamath Falls, were informed of their son’s death. He was also survived by a brother.

   Yeoman was 25 years old.